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Year: 2008
The aim of this article is to describe the communication aspects in health care work in Nepal
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Year: 2008
In times of public danger such as natural disasters and health emergencies, a country’s communication systems will be some of its most important assets because access to information will make individuals and groups more resilient
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Year: 2008
The study looks at the opportunities and constraints of the contributions made by forest institutions to improve the livelihoods of the poorest, through an analysis of the Leasehold Forestry (LF) programme in Nepal – a forestry programme that aims to help alleviate poverty of forest dependent communities by leasing degraded land to the poorest
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Year: 2008
Collaborative and community-based monitoring are becoming more frequent, yet few studies have examined the process and outcomes of these monitoring approaches
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Year: 2008
In October 2008 CTA organised an international seminar on the implications of climate change for sustainable agricultural production systems in ACP countries
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Year: 2007
In this case, alternative media is defined as the combination of processes, methods, information materials and products based on traditional ways of communicating in communities, including poetry, songs, story telling, and town criers
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Year: 2007
Disaster risk reduction (DRR) has emerged as an important agenda item in the development community
Year: 2007
Information is a powerful tool, especially in a disaster
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Year: 2007
Although the focus is on the tsunami, this book examines the link between communication and disasters, relevant in all kinds of disaster risk management scenarios
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Year: 2007
This issue of id21 insights focuses on mobile phones and development:
  • Mobile phones and development - The future in new hands?  'Explosive' is the only way to describe mobile phone growth
  • Micro-enterprise and the 'mobile divide': Mobile phones are starting to penetrate the informal sector in developing countries. Do they bring benefits? Reinforce inequalities? Both?
  • 'Mobile Ladies' in Bangladesh: Villagers often lack information they need to help improve their livelihoods. Such information exists but is often denied to them by the lack of connection to mainstream information systems. Mobile phones can solve this problem.
  • Mobiles reinforce unequal gender relations in Zambia: Mobile phones affect more than just communications. They can also reinforce society's unequal power relations. A three-year study in Zambia looks at this, partly in terms of relationships between husbands and wives.
  • Beyond the three billion mark: In mid-2007, we passed the symbolic mark of three billion mobile phones in use around the world. How did we get here? And how will we reach the next three billion users?
  • M-banking: For many people across the developing world, storing or sending small sums of money is economically impractical. This is due to the high cost and inaccessibility of banks and formal financial services. Recently, however, telecommunications providers, banks, and other companies have begun offering a variety of financial services via a basic mobile phone handset.
  • Mobiles and impoverished households in Jamaica: How do mobile phones affect low income households? Has this technology spread so far that it can now create a development impact right down to the poorest families?
  • Big versus small innovation: While 'big innovation' around mobiles may struggle in developing countries, 'small innovation' is booming.
  • Good practice for mobiles and health: Mobile information and communication technologies (ICTs) are not just phones. In healthcare, personal digital assistants (PDAs) – small hand-held computing devices – are also used.
  • From surveillance to 'sousveillance' in elections: New technologies are often associated with state surveillance of citizens. Mobile phones are no exception.
  • Mobile networks at the centre of infrastructure: Reflecting Northern models, mobile telecommunications in developing countries were initially conceived as secondary to fixed lines.

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