HIMALDOC 295 records found  beginprevious286 - 295  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
Year: 1979
This paper is a preliminary attempt at describing the competence in the learning of Nepali at the primary school level, comparing the competence of those who speak Nepali as a first language (NL1) with that of those who speak Nepali as a second language (NL2)
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Year: 1979
This article analyses the ways that errors in learning languages can be corrected and the attitude towards errors, from a linguistic and non-linguistic approach
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Year: 1978
Alternative futures planning is a generic name for a number of planning approaches which recognize that the future is uncertain
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Year: 1977
Research of rote learning and related topics has been extensive, but is usually limited specific to the Nepalese application of the technique
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Year: 1975
Sixteen years ago, when an old adage that schools in Nepal are as scarce as snakes in Ireland was often taken as literal truth, Bernard Pignede made the discovery that in relatively isolated Dansing-Mohoriya village, some 80% of the Gurung men from 19 to 80 were literate
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These activity worksheets accompany the guide that has been designed to help education and gender campaigners, and organisations and coalitions, work more effectively with the media to promote gender-equitable education
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This guide is designed to help education and gender campaigners, and organisations and coalitions, work more effectively with the media to promote gender-equitable education
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The paper aims to chart aspects of the political, economic and social contexts in which scaling up of girls' education will take place in Commonwealth countries in Africa and considers what the implications of these contexts are for projects and programmes
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Every day, every week, every year DFID, the Department for International Development, is fighting poverty on behalf of the UK public
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Some key facts about women and agriculture in Bhutan:
  • The population consists to 49% of women and to 51% of men;
  • 62% of the women work in agriculture l The literacy rate among rural women is around 10%;
  • The division of labour by gender is not rigidly fixed, as men and women can take over each other's tasks, with few exceptions, and this may vary by ethnicity;
  • 70% of the land is owned by women;
  • The majority of the population follows matrilineal heritage giving women an advantage in ownership of land and livestock;
  • Women considerably contribute to house-hold income through farm and non-farm activities;
  • Women interact closely with the natural resource environment as users of wild plants and forest products;
  • As managers of home gardens, women are both managers of bio-diversity as well as providers of variety to family meals;
  • Based on the assumption of a gender-equitable socialsystem, gender-segregated data arenot readily available

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HIMALDOC 295 records found  beginprevious286 - 295  jump to record: Search took 0.00 seconds. 
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