Information Materials

Information Materials 127 records found  beginprevious118 - 127  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 1999
Challenging widely held assumptions about the current ecological crisis in the Himalaya - that deforestation, for example, can be blamed exclusively on local villagers or that pollution and rampant resource exploitation occur uniformly throughout the range - the authors detail a much more complex scenario in which the population explosion is only one of the many factors affecting the Himalayan landscape and in which some regions exhibit little of the environmental decline witnessed elsewhere
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Year: 1999
Book review: Agricultural Project Services Centre and John Mellor Inc
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Year: 1997
Bibliography of articles that are held in the Contributions to Nepalese Studies over the twenty-five years up to 1997
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An indicator is a pointer
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This two page briefing paper documents how, as awareness of climate change has grown, so too has the gendered dimensions of its effects on people
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Women have a unique relationship with biodiversity and across the globe, women predominate as wild plant gatherers, home gardeners, plant domesticators, herbalists and seed custodians
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There are many ways in which gender makes a difference in biodiversity:
  • Across the globe, women predominate as wild plant gatherers, home gardeners and plant domesticators, herbalists and seed custodians
  • Research on 60 home gardens in Thailand revealed 230 different species, many of which had been rescued by women from neighboring forests before being cleared.
  • Women in different regions of Latin America, Asia and Africa manage the interface between wild and domesticated species of edible plants. This role dates back to 15,000-19,000 B.C.
  • Women and men often have different knowledge about, and preferences for, plants and animals. For example, women’s criteria for choosing certain food crop seeds may include cooking time, meal quality, taste, resistance to bird damage and ease of collection, processing, preservation and storage. Men are more likely to consider yield, suitability for a range of soil types and ease of storage. Both are essential for human welfare.
  • In a study in Sierra Leona, women could name 31 uses of trees on fallow land and in the forest, while men named eight different uses. This shows how men and women have distinct realms of knowledge and application for natural resource management, both of which are necessary for sustainable use and conservation.
  • Women provide close to 80% of the total wild vegetable food collected in 135 different subsistence-based societies. Women often have specialized knowledge about “neglected” species.
  • The majority of plant biodiversity research is not gender sensitive. This has led to incomplete or erroneous scientific results with respect to the diversity, characteristics and uses of plants, and the causes and potential responses to genetic erosion. Integrating women’s traditional knowledge into botanical and ethnobotanical research, and protecting all informants’ rights, are critical for improved knowledge and management.
  • The language used by the Convention on Biological Diversity and the Bonn Guidelines to address subjects related to indigenous and local communities is not gender-sensitive.

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Some key facts about women and agriculture in Bhutan:
  • The population consists to 49% of women and to 51% of men;
  • 62% of the women work in agriculture l The literacy rate among rural women is around 10%;
  • The division of labour by gender is not rigidly fixed, as men and women can take over each other's tasks, with few exceptions, and this may vary by ethnicity;
  • 70% of the land is owned by women;
  • The majority of the population follows matrilineal heritage giving women an advantage in ownership of land and livestock;
  • Women considerably contribute to house-hold income through farm and non-farm activities;
  • Women interact closely with the natural resource environment as users of wild plants and forest products;
  • As managers of home gardens, women are both managers of bio-diversity as well as providers of variety to family meals;
  • Based on the assumption of a gender-equitable socialsystem, gender-segregated data arenot readily available

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Women play a critical role in agriculture throughout the world, producing, processing and providing the food we eat
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At the heart of the solution are farmers - they are the ones who grow our crops, manage the land, and safeguard biodiversity
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Information Materials 127 records found  beginprevious118 - 127  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
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