Reports

Reports 29 records found  previous11 - 20next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 2008
Existing measures to promote peace in Afghanistan are not succeeding
Read More
Year: 2008
This paper outlines urgent action necessary to address immediate challenges in Afghanistan and to avert humanitarian disaster
Read More
Year: 2008
How can aid funds best be spent in areas of high instability? This scoping study from the British Department for International Development (DFID) argues that development funds would have the most impact on improving health outcomes in the Helmand Province of Afghanistan, a country where health is consistently ranked among the top 5 priorities of the general public
Read More
Year: 2008
Increasing insecurity and criminality is jeopardising progress in Afghanistan
Read More
Year: 2008
This report examines Afghanistan’s regional challenges
Read More
Year: 2007
Much of the information on Afghanistan’s biodiversity is old and no longer reliable
Read More
Year: 2007
Fifty countries are currently designated by the United Nations as “least developed countries” (LDCs): Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Kiribati, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sudan, Timor–Leste, Togo, Tuvalu, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Vanuatu, Yemen and Zambia
Year: 2007
The goals of the strategy are to ensure the social, economic and political well-being of rural communities, especially poor and vulnerable people, through the provision of basic services, strengthening local governance and promoting sustainable livelihoods free from a dependency on illicit poppy cultivation
Year: 2007

It is widely believed that there is a strong demand for credit in Afghanistan and that much of this demand is unmet, justifying a major programme in microcredit provision

  • informal credit practices are widespread with most households both giving and taking credit, having multiple outstanding debts simultaneously and a variety of different households with whom they exchange credit.
  • there is great diversity in informal credit practices, the meanings of which have to be understood according to social context. A large proportion of these credit transactions are on a no-interest basis.
  • informal credit is almost exclusively used for either consumption smoothing or marriage with very little being deployed for investment in enterprises.
  • the reasons for entering into informal credit relations are diverse but include investment in social networks for informal security, for providing assistance as well as maintaining or consolidating patron client relations.
  • a majority of households are able to access credit and have confidence that they will be able to do so.repayment practices are usually highly flexible and negotiable.
  • for many of the households informal credit has positive outcomes in achieving immediate welfare goals.

This, however, is not universal and the dynamics and characteristics of informal credit are changing over time. The methods used in this study have highlighted the complexity of informal credit and question the application of models of formal credit to informal credit. Notions of debt, interest rates and contractual periods, for example carry very different meanings from those that formal credit assume
Read More

Year: 2006

This publications synthesises results from a three-country research project on Afghan transnational networks and sustainable reintegration conducted by the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) in 2004-5

  • Migration and the formation of transnational networks are key livelihood strategies for the people of Afghanistan; a simple distinction between political and economic causes, associated with involuntary or voluntary migration, cannot do justice to the complexity of these migration flows.
  • Migration is an ancient phenomenon in the region, not simply a response to poverty or war and a cultural model, not merely an act of flight followed by integration into the host country or eventual repatriation.
The relevant governments and the international assistance community should work towards:
  • policy prescriptions to manage population movements to the benefit of all involved, rather than straightforward repatriation initiatives, and to improve the economic and security situation in Afghanistan.
  • establishing bilateral labour migration frameworks that provide clear legal rights for Afghan labourers and increase awareness of the labour and other contributions made by Afghans to the Iranian and Pakistani economies.

  • Read More
Reports 29 records found  previous11 - 20next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
email alert or subscribe to the RSS feed.