Newsletters

Newsletters 10 records found  Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 2009
Articles in the Bulletin focus on the theme of mountain agriculture and include the following:
  • Recognising the amenities of mountain agriculture in Europe by Thomas Dax
  • Agricultural Diversity in Coping with Climate Change by Bandana Shakya
  • Livelihoods at Risk: Agricultural Viability and Converging Climatic and Economic Change in the Central Andes by Adam French and Jeffrey Bury
  • Traditional irrigation system: A case of Apatani tribe in Arunachal Himalaya, North East India by Mihin Dollo
  • Medicinal Plants in the Valais: A success story by Charly Darbellay
  • No Land Left for Women: Property Rights in Baltistan (Central Karakoram) by Nadine Guenther, Tine Maikowski & Matthias Schmidt
  • From subsistence to cash generating crops: a case study of changing cropping pattern in the Garhwal Himalaya, India Dr
  • Experiences in Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management in the mid-hills of Nepal: out-scaling the lessons Isabelle Providoli
  • Dzo: the mule of the Himalayas in a changing climate by Nakul Chettri
  • Women on forefront:  Conservation of Traditional Crop Biodiversity: A Study of Uttarakhand State in Indian Himalaya by Rajendra Prasad Juyal and Mahesh Chandra Sati
  • Nepal’s declining agriculture production in changing climate by Mohan Prasad Devkota and Ashok Kumar Koirala
  • Mountain Farming Support in Austria by Gerhard Hovorka and Thomas Dax
  • Himalayan Pastoralism by Naomi Bishop
  • Promoting Food Self-Sufficiency in the mid-hills of Nepal: fertilizers or farmyard manure? Prepared by the SDC-Helvetas-Intercooperation Sustainable Soil Management Programme, Nepal
  • Interview with Mr. Mahabir Pun, Chairman at E-network Research and Development
  • Film Screenings - An effective tool for Conservation Education by Nimesh Ved
  • Maintaining Agricultural Biodiversity in the European Mountain Regions: Alps, Carpathians and Balkans SAVE Monitoring Institute by Elli Broxham and Waltraud Kugler
  • World premiere of a high-realist portrait of the Cross River gorilla by African Conservation Foundation
  • Foundation for Sustainable Development in Mountain Regions (FDDM) by Eric Nanchen

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Year: 2008
This issue of id21 insights focuses on nutrition of women and children:
  • Improving the nutrition status of children and women: The high world food prices that we are currently experiencing provide a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of large parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to hunger and undernutrition
  • Why is undernutrition not a higher priority for donors? The prevention of chronic undernutrition is vital for reducing mortality and morbidity, for economic productivity, and for the respect and protection of human rights. Yet nutrition interventions tend to be low priorities for donors and developing country governments.
  • Strong public-private sector partnerships can help to reduce undernutrition: Global progress towards reducing undernutrition has been made through enlightened public policies, targeted development assistance, private sector actions and commitments from civil society. Yet every year, the deaths of more than 3.5 million children under the age of 5 can be attributed to undernutrition.
  • The success of salt iodisation: A shortage of iodine in a diet can cause cretinism, mental retardation and premature birth. These iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) can be eliminated by adding iodine to cooking salt.
  • The price of hunger: The first Millennium Development Goal – to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger – reflects the fact that undernutrition is both a symptom and a cause of poverty. The first measure of success is well known: to halve the number of people earning less than US$1 a day. The other – to halve the number of people suffering from inadequate food consumption – is equally important but less well known.
  • The persistence of child malnutrition in Africa: Malnutrition affects about 30 percent of children in Africa, caused by low birth weight and post-natal growth faltering. Child malnutrition is a persistent problem. The long term trend shows only slow improvement, and malnutrition rates worsen during droughts, economic crises, conflicts and displacement, and HIV.
  • Nutrition for mothers and children: Article 25.2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights establishes that motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. Yet maternal and child undernutrition are still highly prevalent in most developing countries.
  • Why have donors committed so few direct investments to eliminate child undernutrition? The mandate of most international donors is to reduce poverty, suffering and inequity. Addressing child undernutrition falls within this. However, current donor investment to directly address undernutrition is estimated to be well under half of the resources required.
  • What can be done to accelerate progress against undernutrition?  Many organisations work to eliminate undernutrition in children and pregnant and lactating women in developing countries. These organisations – international organisations, donors, academia, civil society and private sector – are loosely linked as an international nutrition system. However, this system is fragmented and dysfunctional.

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Year: 2007
In this issue of id21 insights, the focus is on health of mothers and babies:
  • Improving the health of mothers and babies - Breaking through health system constraints: Improving maternal health remains the most elusive of the Millennium Development Goals
  • Achieving universal coverage of maternal health care: Maternal health can only be improved if mothers receive care from pregnancy through to childbirth and beyond. For this to happen, health systems need to be strengthened with maternal, newborn and child health care at the core. For some countries this can be done relatively quickly, for others it will take far longer.
  • 'Too much care' threatens maternal health: Whilst the major focus of international advocacy and policy for maternal health is on enabling women to have access to skilled care during pregnancy and childbirth, some women face severe morbidity, even death, from an excess of maternity care.
  • The impact of maternal health on poverty: The links between poverty and poor maternal health are well established. Poorer countries experience the highest rates of maternal mortality, whilst maternal death and life-threatening and debilitating illness are higher among women from poorer households. However, there is now growing evidence that poor maternal health can also exacerbate poverty.
  • Shortages and shortcomings - The maternal health workforce crisis: Providing maternal care requires a viable and effective health workforce. In many countries, and certainly in all countries where maternal mortality is high, the size, skills and infrastructure of the workforce is inadequate.
  • Generating political priority to reduce maternal mortality: Why do some serious health issues receive significant attention from political leaders and others get very little? To achieve the Millennium Development Goal target of reducing maternal mortality, governments must prioritise this issue.
  • A forgotten priority - Maternal health service infrastructure: Weak health service infrastructure contributes to poor maternal health. Apart from inadequate skilled human resources, substandard infrastructure includes poor access to functioning equipment and a lack of essential drugs and supplies.

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Year: 2007
This issue of id21 insights focuses on the quality of teachers:
  • More and better teachers needed - Achieving quality education for all: Eighteen million primary school teachers are needed over the next decade to meet Universal Primary Education (UPE) goals, says a recent report from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics
  • Effective professional development: Continuing — or in-service — professional development (CPD) for teachers is widely considered a critical condition for improved instructional quality and student learning.
  • Missing in action - Addressing teacher absenteeism: Getting teachers to come to work is a major barrier to improving education outcomes in some developing countries, especially in South Asia. Governments often spend 70 to 90 percent of their recurrent education budgets on teacher salaries, without the most basic of returns.
  • Changes in the primary teaching profession in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa: For many countries in sub-Saharan Africa achieving universal access to quality primary education has meant recruiting many more teachers at the same time as improving the quality of teaching.
  • Gender equality and HIV and AIDS in Uganda: HIV and AIDS widen existing inequalities of access to education for boys and girls. Research in Luweero district in central Uganda shows the negative impact of HIV and AIDS on primary school teachers and students in rural areas. Particular efforts are required to ensure that teachers can fulfil their potential to promote gender equality in schools.
  • Fighting for their lives - Political violence against teachers in Colombia: Awareness of the scale of human rights violations against Colombian trade unionists is growing. Of the 1,174 reported murders of trade unionists worldwide between 1999 and 2005, 860 were Colombian and half of these were teachers, according to the Colombian National Trade Union School.
  • Finding the pathway - Women teachers' aspirations in northern Pakistan: Women teachers face enormous cultural challenges in northern Pakistan. Research from the Aga Khan University explores women's experiences of trying to build teaching careers within this patriarchal society and looks at how they balance their multiple commitments.
Available also in French.

 

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Year: 2007
The Bulletin focuses on biodiversity:
  • Monitoring Biodiversity on the Saharan Slopes of the High Atlas, Morocco by Manfred Finckh, Anna Augustin and Norbert Jürgens
  • Closures: A System of Biodiversity Conservation through Community Participation in the Highlands of Eritrea by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Biodiversity Assessment in Lobo-San Juan Mountains by Anacleto M
  • Biodiversity Management: Towards Re-establishment of a Protected Areas System in Afghanistan by Stephan Fuller
  • A Challenge for Environmental Continuity in Italian Mountains by Bernardino Romano, Serna Ciabò and Mauro Fabrizio
  • Maintaining Bio-cultural Diversity in the Andes by Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel and Stephan Rist
  • Land Use Change and Biodiversity Conservation in the Venezuelan Páramo: Integrating Farmers’ Perceptions by Luis D. Llambí, Julia K. Smith and Maximina Monasterio
  • Lessons from Kipahulu Valley, Maui by John Cusick
  • Three Decades of Managing Mountain Development in the Himalayan Region – Interview with Dr. James Gabriel Campbell by Ujol Sherchan
  • Book review: Floods in Bangladesh: History, Dynamics and Rethinking the Role of the Himalayas
  • Chua-Chua Botanical Gardens by Farmer Tantoh
  • Sustainable Harvest of Medicinal Plants - Charting the Beginnings of this Initiative from the Astore Conservancy by Athar Ali Khan
  • Empowering Women through Alternative Media for Biodiversity Conservation by Rashmi Gangwar
  • Preserving Mountain Biodiversity in the Western Ghats of the Madurai District, Tamil Nadu by S. P. Anandan
  • Cross-border Balkans Peace Park Project by Antonia Young and Abbey Radis
  • Democratising Forestry in Mexico’s Sierra Norte by Ross E. Mitchell
  • Mapping the La Paz-El Alto Foodshed by Stephen Taranto and Martina Brimmer
  • Andean Páramo Project: Conserving Biological Diversity by Bert De Bievre
  • Biodiversity and the Mountain Partnership by Jane Ross
  • The Carpathian Mountains - the Living Heart of Europe by Pam McCarthy
  • Centre for Environment Education (CEE) Himalaya Celebrates International Mountain Day by Rashmi Gangwar

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on remittances and how they can reduce poverty:
  • Sending money home: Can remittances reduce poverty?  At least US$232 billion will be sent back home globally by around 200 million migrants to their families in 2005, three times official development aid (US$78
  • Do remittances reduce poverty?  International remittances to developing countries will total around US$167 billion in 2005, more than twice official aid flows. Despite the ever-increasing size of international remittances, little attention has been paid to their effect on poverty and income distribution in developing countries and many policy questions remain unanswered.
  • Improving health and education: Remittances encourage investment in education and health, especially for children. New research suggests they can help families break the cycle of poverty and improve living conditions for future generations.
  • Boosting economic growth: Remittances by international migrants to their countries of origin constitute the largest source of external finance for developing economies after foreign direct investment (FDI). Estimated official remittances are US$167 billion for developing countries in 2005, double total development aid.
  • New regulations restrict Somali remittances: Approximately one million Somalis send US$1 billion back home every year, a crucial source of income for most of the Somali population. New regulations, however, as part of the 'war on terror', are restricting the flow of remittances into the country.
  • A better quality of life?  Remittances have an important role to play in the economic development of a country. Yet their impact is primarily seen at the regional and local level as a source of income to improve the wellbeing of thousands of households in migrant-sending countries.
  • Sending money home to Asia: Half the world's international migrants and most international labour migrants come from Asia. It is the main destination region for remittance flows from north to south, as well as within Asia from countries such as South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand. The scale of remittances in Asia is unknown, however, and few policies exist to maximise their developmental impact.
  • Gender matters: Are remittance flows gender-neutral? Does it matter if the people involved in these transactions are male or female? Do remittances reshape gender relations?

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children's rights to learn in their own mother tongue:
  • Mother tongue first - Children's right to learn in their own languages: Education is power and language is the key to accessing that power
  • Linguistic genocide? Children's right to education in their own languages: We are killing languages faster than ever. By 2100, between 90 and 95 percent of today's approximately 7,000 spoken languages may be extinct or no longer learned by children.
  • Gender, language and inclusion: Schooling designed for dominant groups excludes other learners. Girls are particularly vulnerable because of their home responsibilities and the unsupportive attitudes of families and teachers.
  • Revitalising indigenous languages: Over the past 30 years there has been a blossoming of education approaches for and by indigenous peoples. Where there are bilingual and intercultural or multicultural programmes for indigenous peoples, indigenous students have achieved higher performance and attendance rates.
  • Bolivia revolutionises bilingual education: Intercultural and Bilingual Education supports the rights of indigenous school children to be taught in their own languages.
  • Policy and practice in Viet Nam: The government of Viet Nam recognises 54 minority ethnic groups and languages. It expresses strong commitment to the development of its ethnic minority communities, about 13 percent of the population which, however, have missed out on Viet Nam's dramatic economic growth.
  • Bridging languages in education: International awareness of the importance of Education for All has grown. Yet, the only schooling available in many non-dominant language communities uses a language students do not understand or speak to teach concepts that have very little to do with their way of life.
  • Mother tongue and bilingual education: Language education in Africa seldom provides a solid foundation for literacy and numeracy development. Instead of learning in a familiar language, pupils learn through an international language before they know it well enough.
  • Mother tongue education is cost-effective: Policymakers are often reluctant to support mother tongue as a medium of instruction in schools, arguing it is too expensive. Yet the savings can be significant.
  • Linguistic diversity and policy in India: India is a mosaic of linguistic diversity. of its 1,600 languages, grouped somewhat arbitrarily into 114 groups, has a clear majority. Yet children often start school in a language that is not their mother tongue.
Also available in French and Spanish

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Year: 2002
Since 1994, Chhetri and her sisters have run a trekking business in Pokhara
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Year: 1995
Tage Michaelson (FAO) stated that the main conclusion in the report E/CN
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