Newsletters

Newsletters 15 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 2009
The Third International Workshop on Community-Based Adaptation to Climate Change was held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, from 18-24 February 2009
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Year: 2009
This section contains list of key resources on mountain biodiversity aggregated from different sources focusing on the global and key regional resources
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Year: 2008
Despite the adoption of many international agreements over the last decades, degradation of forests and deforestation has continued
Year: 2008
The Global Renewable Energy Forum was held in May 2008 and was organised by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and Brazilian Ministry of Mones and Energy, Electrobras and Itaipu Binacional
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Year: 2008
The Global Renewable Energy Forum was held at the Bourbon Cataratas Hotel, in Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil, from 18-21 May 2008
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Year: 2008
IUCN's Programme on Protected Areas (PPA) provides updates on latest protected area and IUCN news
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Year: 2007
The Bulletin focuses on biodiversity:
  • Monitoring Biodiversity on the Saharan Slopes of the High Atlas, Morocco by Manfred Finckh, Anna Augustin and Norbert Jürgens
  • Closures: A System of Biodiversity Conservation through Community Participation in the Highlands of Eritrea by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Biodiversity Assessment in Lobo-San Juan Mountains by Anacleto M
  • Biodiversity Management: Towards Re-establishment of a Protected Areas System in Afghanistan by Stephan Fuller
  • A Challenge for Environmental Continuity in Italian Mountains by Bernardino Romano, Serna Ciabò and Mauro Fabrizio
  • Maintaining Bio-cultural Diversity in the Andes by Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel and Stephan Rist
  • Land Use Change and Biodiversity Conservation in the Venezuelan Páramo: Integrating Farmers’ Perceptions by Luis D. Llambí, Julia K. Smith and Maximina Monasterio
  • Lessons from Kipahulu Valley, Maui by John Cusick
  • Three Decades of Managing Mountain Development in the Himalayan Region – Interview with Dr. James Gabriel Campbell by Ujol Sherchan
  • Book review: Floods in Bangladesh: History, Dynamics and Rethinking the Role of the Himalayas
  • Chua-Chua Botanical Gardens by Farmer Tantoh
  • Sustainable Harvest of Medicinal Plants - Charting the Beginnings of this Initiative from the Astore Conservancy by Athar Ali Khan
  • Empowering Women through Alternative Media for Biodiversity Conservation by Rashmi Gangwar
  • Preserving Mountain Biodiversity in the Western Ghats of the Madurai District, Tamil Nadu by S. P. Anandan
  • Cross-border Balkans Peace Park Project by Antonia Young and Abbey Radis
  • Democratising Forestry in Mexico’s Sierra Norte by Ross E. Mitchell
  • Mapping the La Paz-El Alto Foodshed by Stephen Taranto and Martina Brimmer
  • Andean Páramo Project: Conserving Biological Diversity by Bert De Bievre
  • Biodiversity and the Mountain Partnership by Jane Ross
  • The Carpathian Mountains - the Living Heart of Europe by Pam McCarthy
  • Centre for Environment Education (CEE) Himalaya Celebrates International Mountain Day by Rashmi Gangwar

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Year: 2006
This newsletter presents the overall conclusions from the environmental service incentive (ESIs) component of the Roles of Agriculture Project Phase II
Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on education during times of emergencies:
  • Educating young people in emergencies - Time to end the neglect: Armed conflict and natural disasters tear communities apart
  • Applying minimum standards in Indonesia: For many humanitarian agencies, the tsunami in December 2004 tested their ability to assist in educating children on a massive scale. It also raised important challenges in applying the new Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction (MSEE) recently developed by the Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies.
  • New survey reveals major gaps in education: Most children and young people growing up in war zones miss out on education. Precise data, however, are lacking.
  • Life skills, peace education and AIDS prevention: Adolescents in post-conflict situations face many risks including HIV/AIDS and recruitment by fighting forces. Life skills training can add enormously to general education and provide support for emotional and social skills, particularly for HIV prevention and peace-building.
  • Young people speak out: Between 2000 and 2002 over150 adolescents led studies on the problems facing young people in Kosovo, northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, with the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children and other organisations. Despite the different stages of conflict and the diverse cultural, political and social backgrounds of the 3,000 adolescents and young adults interviewed, most said that education is critical to achieving physical protection, psychosocial recovery, peace and development.
  • Young people take the initiative: Young people in Africa face obstacles - poverty, war, discrimination - to a better life and to fulfilling their dreams. In frustration some resort to joining militias or becoming petty criminals or prostitutes in search of friendship, protection and food. The great majority do not want this, however; they want to get better educated and earn a living.
  • Make learning relevant, say young people: As thousands of Rwandans were killed or fled to neighbouring countries ten years ago, the international community provided primary school education in exile camps and local communities. Surveys by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) found that young people wanted to learn but felt that education is not available and that subjects taught are not relevant.
  • Civil war in Uganda - Education as a means of protection: Over 18 years of civil war in northern Uganda, fought mainly between the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the Ugandan military, has prevented young people from getting a good education. Over 90 percent of people live in camps for internally displaced persons and most schools in Kitgum and Pader districts are closed despite efforts to achieve Universal Primary Education
  • Post-primary education - Time to deliver: Primary education is increasingly seen as a priority on the same level as ‘life saving’ activities such as ensuring good health, adequate food supply and water and sanitation facilities. Most refugee camps have primary schools and many adolescents attend these classes. After primary, however, there is a mixed pattern of refugee education.
  • Young people reshape the future: Conflict has a devastating impact on education - it disrupts schooling and destroys educational infrastructure. Yet education systems are usually expected to contribute significantly to rebuilding shattered societies. They have to do this in a society suffering from the after effects of conflict and the psychological impact felt by pupils, teachers and communities. In post conflict situations, political authority and civil administration are often weak, compromised, or inexperienced; civil society is in disorder and financial resources limited.
  • Youth peace-building responds to inter-communal conflict: Peace-building programmes for young people are being pioneered to transform social relationships in countries and regions suffering long-standing conflict such as Northern Ireland, Cyprus, the Middle East, the Balkans, India and Pakistan: young people go to a neutral country where they are free from the pressures of conflict and violence.

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Newsletters 15 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
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