Newsletters

Newsletters 4 records found  Search took 0.00 seconds. 
Year: 2009
This newsletter gives an update on WCPA Oceania, covering also international, Australian, New Zealand and Pacific island news
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Year: 2008
Articles include the following:
  • Earth Hour, the Power of One and Shaping Nepali Environmental Thinking by Surya B
  • The incongruity of territorial perceptions as obstacle to resource management in communal land – case study from southern Morocco by Manfred Finckh & Holger Kirscht
  • Gender Roles in Household Energy Management:  Issues and Implications by Ishari Mahat
  • Conflict in Kugha watershed by Farmer Tantoh
  • People’s Participation in Forest Resource Management in the Uttaranchal Himalaya by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Natural resource management based micro-enterprises development in the Garhwal Himalayas by Ashok Pokhriyal and Laxmi Prakash Semwal
  • Irrigation and an approach of sort in Peru by José Carvajal
  • Ancestral Bio-Indicators in Andean Highland Regions: Disaster warning and resilience mechanisms by Sergio Alvarez Gutierrez
  • Interview on Everest Eco-Expedition by Marianne Heredge and Ujol Sherchan
  • Signs of climate change on roof-top of the world by Tsewang Namgail
  • Book review on Ecology and Human Well-Being by Pushpam Kumar and B. Sudhakara Reddy
  • Forests, people and power edited by Oliver Springate-Baginski and Piers Blaikie
  • Seabuckthorn by Helga Ahmad
  • News from the Mountain Research Initiative: The Global Change Research Network in African Mountains by The Mountain Research Initiative
  • Visit to Harsing, a beautiful old tea garden in Darjeeling by Nirnay John Chettri
  • Energy Saving and Drudgery Reducing Technology Initiative by Jagriti
  • Resource Management: Conflict, Use and Role of Women by C.L.Chowdhary
  • Education in a remote hill district of Nepal: Deusa Secondary School, Solukhumbu by Marianne Heredge
  • Reconciling Community Development Needs and Great Apes Conservation: the twin-track approach by African Conservation Foundation
  • Revival of mountain tourism in earthquake affected areas of Kaghan Valley in Northern Pakistan by Aftab-ur-Rehman Rana
  • William L. Brown Center for Plant Genetic Resources
  • Centre for Mountain Studies: Scotland by Martin Price
  • From Spain: Update on RedMontañas activities by Manzanares el Real
  • SYFA Update by Farmer Tantoh
  • MSc Environment and Development of Mountainous Areas - National Technical University of Athens (N.T.U.A.)

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Year: 2008
There is significant overlap between the practice and theory of disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation
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Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on education during times of emergencies:
  • Educating young people in emergencies - Time to end the neglect: Armed conflict and natural disasters tear communities apart
  • Applying minimum standards in Indonesia: For many humanitarian agencies, the tsunami in December 2004 tested their ability to assist in educating children on a massive scale. It also raised important challenges in applying the new Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction (MSEE) recently developed by the Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies.
  • New survey reveals major gaps in education: Most children and young people growing up in war zones miss out on education. Precise data, however, are lacking.
  • Life skills, peace education and AIDS prevention: Adolescents in post-conflict situations face many risks including HIV/AIDS and recruitment by fighting forces. Life skills training can add enormously to general education and provide support for emotional and social skills, particularly for HIV prevention and peace-building.
  • Young people speak out: Between 2000 and 2002 over150 adolescents led studies on the problems facing young people in Kosovo, northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, with the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children and other organisations. Despite the different stages of conflict and the diverse cultural, political and social backgrounds of the 3,000 adolescents and young adults interviewed, most said that education is critical to achieving physical protection, psychosocial recovery, peace and development.
  • Young people take the initiative: Young people in Africa face obstacles - poverty, war, discrimination - to a better life and to fulfilling their dreams. In frustration some resort to joining militias or becoming petty criminals or prostitutes in search of friendship, protection and food. The great majority do not want this, however; they want to get better educated and earn a living.
  • Make learning relevant, say young people: As thousands of Rwandans were killed or fled to neighbouring countries ten years ago, the international community provided primary school education in exile camps and local communities. Surveys by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) found that young people wanted to learn but felt that education is not available and that subjects taught are not relevant.
  • Civil war in Uganda - Education as a means of protection: Over 18 years of civil war in northern Uganda, fought mainly between the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the Ugandan military, has prevented young people from getting a good education. Over 90 percent of people live in camps for internally displaced persons and most schools in Kitgum and Pader districts are closed despite efforts to achieve Universal Primary Education
  • Post-primary education - Time to deliver: Primary education is increasingly seen as a priority on the same level as ‘life saving’ activities such as ensuring good health, adequate food supply and water and sanitation facilities. Most refugee camps have primary schools and many adolescents attend these classes. After primary, however, there is a mixed pattern of refugee education.
  • Young people reshape the future: Conflict has a devastating impact on education - it disrupts schooling and destroys educational infrastructure. Yet education systems are usually expected to contribute significantly to rebuilding shattered societies. They have to do this in a society suffering from the after effects of conflict and the psychological impact felt by pupils, teachers and communities. In post conflict situations, political authority and civil administration are often weak, compromised, or inexperienced; civil society is in disorder and financial resources limited.
  • Youth peace-building responds to inter-communal conflict: Peace-building programmes for young people are being pioneered to transform social relationships in countries and regions suffering long-standing conflict such as Northern Ireland, Cyprus, the Middle East, the Balkans, India and Pakistan: young people go to a neutral country where they are free from the pressures of conflict and violence.

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