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Year: 2009
Articles in this edition of the Mountain Forum Bulletin include:
  • Mountain Diversity - A Global Heritage - Eva M
  • Are Ethiopian Highlands changing? Amphibians as Ecosystem Indicators - Simon Loader, Abebe Mengistu, Silvia Schwaller, David Gower, Peter Nagel, Abebe Getahun, Samy Saber and Roman Kassahun
  • PARADISE LOST? Conservation of Mount Marsabit Forest Ecosystem, Northern Kenya - Wario R. Adano
  • Responses to Threats and Impacts on the Outstanding Biodiversity Values of Low-Altitude Mountains in South Western Australia - Anne Cochrane, Sarah Barrett and John Watson
  • Impacts of Armed Conflict on Mountain Biodiversity: Experiences from Nepal - Bishnu Upreti
  • Conservation of Agrobiodiversity through Traditionally Cultivating ‘Barahnaja’ in the Garhwal Himalaya, India - Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Biodiversity Conservation and Crop Improvement in a Fragile Agro-Ecosystem: Insights from Guangxi, China - Song Yiching, Zhang Shihuang, with Ronnie Vernooy
  • Intensified Sheep Grazing Decreases the Biodiversity of Alpine Grasslands in the Carpathians, Romania - Bruno Baur
  • Main Threats to Mountain Biodiversity in Georgia - George Nakhutsrishvili, Maia Akhalkatsi and Otar Abdaladze
  • Recent Change of Alpine Vegetation and Plant Species Richness in the Swedish Scandes - Leif Kullman
  • Mountain Biodiversity, Genetic Resources and Cultures - Promila Kapoor-Vijay
  • Spread of Non-Native Plant Species into Mountains: Now is the Time to Act - Keith McDougall, Sylvia Haider, Tim Seipel, Christoph Kueffer and MIREN Consortium
  • Changes in Biodiversity Patterns in the High Andes - Understanding the Consequences and Seeking Adaptation to Global Change - Anton Seimon, Karina Yager , Tracie Seimon, Steve Schmidt, Alfredo Grau, Stephan Beck, Carolina García, Alfredo Tupayachi, Preston Sowell, Jerry Touval and Stephan Halloy
  • Protection of the Cloud Forests and Their Biodiversity in the Coastal Cordillera of Venezuela - Winfried Meier
  • Transboundary Landscape Conservation in the Eastern Himalaya – Interview with Dr. Nakul Chettri - Samuel Thomas and Ujol Sherchan
  • Global Mountain Biodiversity - Eva Spehn
  • Global Change in Mountain Regions: The Mountain Research Initiative - Claudia Drexler
  • ICIMOD’s International Conference, Workshops on Mountain Biodiversity - ICIMOD
  • Photo Exhibition: Changing Landscapes - Nonna Lamponen
  • Biodiversity and Climate Change Research Programme of the Snow and Mountain Research Centre of Andorra (CENMA) - Marta Doménech
  • Climate Change and Biodiversity in the European Union Overseas Entities - Guilluame Prudent
  • Caribou of the Canadian Rockies: Understanding Environmental Change in the Context of Conservation and Evolution - Byron Weckworth
  • Thoughts on the Food Crisis in the Andes - Judith Kuan Cubillas, Consultora de CONDESAN
  • Invertebrate Monitoring at GLORIA Target Regions: The First Results From the Urals and Need for Global Networking - Yuri Mikhailov
  • Walking through My Land: A Little Sparrow - Walter Bishop V.
  • Metsovion Interdisciplinary Research Centre Database (MIRC)
  • Angeliki Geronteli, on behalf of the N.T .U.A., M.I.R.C
  • Technological Innovation Servicing Biodiversity - Lourdes Chuquipiondo (RAMP PERU)
  • Birds from the Albertine Rift - Michel Louette (RMCA)
  • Agrobiodiversity in the Alps: Establishment of a Long-Term Monitoring System - Elli Broxham
  • Project Snow Leopard: Participatory Conservation Model for the Indian Himalaya - Pranav Trivedi
  • The Importance of Mediterranean Alpine Biodiversity in Central Spain - Rosario Gavilán and Alba Gutiérrez Girón
  • New Views of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya for Conserving Biodiversity - Daniel J. Miller
  • Vegetation Types of the Endangered Eastern Ghats Mountain Ecosystem in Southern Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, India - G Areendran, Prakash Rao and Krishna Raj
  • Useful Resources for Mountain Biodiversity
  • Mountain Calendar

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Year: 2008
The Mountain Forum Bulletin focuses on the theme of climate change in mountains and adaptation to climate change
Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children's rights to learn in their own mother tongue:
  • Mother tongue first - Children's right to learn in their own languages: Education is power and language is the key to accessing that power
  • Linguistic genocide? Children's right to education in their own languages: We are killing languages faster than ever. By 2100, between 90 and 95 percent of today's approximately 7,000 spoken languages may be extinct or no longer learned by children.
  • Gender, language and inclusion: Schooling designed for dominant groups excludes other learners. Girls are particularly vulnerable because of their home responsibilities and the unsupportive attitudes of families and teachers.
  • Revitalising indigenous languages: Over the past 30 years there has been a blossoming of education approaches for and by indigenous peoples. Where there are bilingual and intercultural or multicultural programmes for indigenous peoples, indigenous students have achieved higher performance and attendance rates.
  • Bolivia revolutionises bilingual education: Intercultural and Bilingual Education supports the rights of indigenous school children to be taught in their own languages.
  • Policy and practice in Viet Nam: The government of Viet Nam recognises 54 minority ethnic groups and languages. It expresses strong commitment to the development of its ethnic minority communities, about 13 percent of the population which, however, have missed out on Viet Nam's dramatic economic growth.
  • Bridging languages in education: International awareness of the importance of Education for All has grown. Yet, the only schooling available in many non-dominant language communities uses a language students do not understand or speak to teach concepts that have very little to do with their way of life.
  • Mother tongue and bilingual education: Language education in Africa seldom provides a solid foundation for literacy and numeracy development. Instead of learning in a familiar language, pupils learn through an international language before they know it well enough.
  • Mother tongue education is cost-effective: Policymakers are often reluctant to support mother tongue as a medium of instruction in schools, arguing it is too expensive. Yet the savings can be significant.
  • Linguistic diversity and policy in India: India is a mosaic of linguistic diversity. of its 1,600 languages, grouped somewhat arbitrarily into 114 groups, has a clear majority. Yet children often start school in a language that is not their mother tongue.
Also available in French and Spanish

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Year: 2005
This paper discusses a June 2004 conference, “Sharing Indigenous Wisdom: An International Dialogue On Sustainable Development,” hosted by the College of Menominee Nation’s Sustainable Development Institute
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Year: 2005
In this issue of id21, the focus is on people living in protected areas:
  • People and protected areas: New agendas for conservation: For many threatened plants and animals, protected areas are a vital refuge in the face of declining natural habitats
  • Making waves: Protecting marine and coastal areas involves many similar issues to terrestrial protected areas, including balancing conservation and development needs and managing tradeoffs between multiple users. However, they also present unique challenges: they often cross international boundaries and the high mobility or migration of many marine species makes protection beyond boundaries difficult.
  • Is forced displacement acceptable in conservation projects? Over ten million people have been displaced from protected areas by conservation projects. Forced displacement in developing countries is a major obstacle to reducing poverty. It should no longer be considered a mainstream strategy for conservation and only applied in extreme cases following international standards.
  • Learning to learn: Societies place a high value on addressing two of the world's most pressing problems - alleviating poverty and protecting the world's biological diversity. A lot of money has been spent on these two objectives, international treaties have been signed and countless organisations have devoted time to implementing funds in projects.
  • Protecting nature, culture and people: Indigenous peoples' traditional ownership and use of land and resources has often been eroded by protected areas. Their consent has rarely been sought for establishing protected areas on their lands, nor have they received adequate compensation. But are conservation organisations and government protected area agencies beginning to recognise the important role these peoples can play?
  • Agriculture vs protected areas: Agriculturalists strive to increase crop production to provide poor communities with incomes and a secure food supply whilst environmentalists want to expand protected areas and reduce the intensity of farming.
  • Tourism in Nepal: Tourism in the Greater Himalaya supports the local economy with foreign exchange and by creating opportunities for local employment. Mass and unregulated tourism, however, can cause environmental damage, particularly in ecologically fragile areas. Is ecotourism - responsible travel that aims to conserve the environment and improve local people's welfare - an effective compromise?
  • Governance of protected areas: The 2003 World Parks Congress and 2004 Programme of Work on Protected Areas of the Convention on Biological Diversity brought unprecedented attention to the concept of governance of protected areas, with crucial implications for conservation worldwide.

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