Newsletters

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Year: 2007
The Bulletin focuses on biodiversity:
  • Monitoring Biodiversity on the Saharan Slopes of the High Atlas, Morocco by Manfred Finckh, Anna Augustin and Norbert Jürgens
  • Closures: A System of Biodiversity Conservation through Community Participation in the Highlands of Eritrea by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Biodiversity Assessment in Lobo-San Juan Mountains by Anacleto M
  • Biodiversity Management: Towards Re-establishment of a Protected Areas System in Afghanistan by Stephan Fuller
  • A Challenge for Environmental Continuity in Italian Mountains by Bernardino Romano, Serna Ciabò and Mauro Fabrizio
  • Maintaining Bio-cultural Diversity in the Andes by Sarah-Lan Mathez-Stiefel and Stephan Rist
  • Land Use Change and Biodiversity Conservation in the Venezuelan Páramo: Integrating Farmers’ Perceptions by Luis D. Llambí, Julia K. Smith and Maximina Monasterio
  • Lessons from Kipahulu Valley, Maui by John Cusick
  • Three Decades of Managing Mountain Development in the Himalayan Region – Interview with Dr. James Gabriel Campbell by Ujol Sherchan
  • Book review: Floods in Bangladesh: History, Dynamics and Rethinking the Role of the Himalayas
  • Chua-Chua Botanical Gardens by Farmer Tantoh
  • Sustainable Harvest of Medicinal Plants - Charting the Beginnings of this Initiative from the Astore Conservancy by Athar Ali Khan
  • Empowering Women through Alternative Media for Biodiversity Conservation by Rashmi Gangwar
  • Preserving Mountain Biodiversity in the Western Ghats of the Madurai District, Tamil Nadu by S. P. Anandan
  • Cross-border Balkans Peace Park Project by Antonia Young and Abbey Radis
  • Democratising Forestry in Mexico’s Sierra Norte by Ross E. Mitchell
  • Mapping the La Paz-El Alto Foodshed by Stephen Taranto and Martina Brimmer
  • Andean Páramo Project: Conserving Biological Diversity by Bert De Bievre
  • Biodiversity and the Mountain Partnership by Jane Ross
  • The Carpathian Mountains - the Living Heart of Europe by Pam McCarthy
  • Centre for Environment Education (CEE) Himalaya Celebrates International Mountain Day by Rashmi Gangwar

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children's rights to learn in their own mother tongue:
  • Mother tongue first - Children's right to learn in their own languages: Education is power and language is the key to accessing that power
  • Linguistic genocide? Children's right to education in their own languages: We are killing languages faster than ever. By 2100, between 90 and 95 percent of today's approximately 7,000 spoken languages may be extinct or no longer learned by children.
  • Gender, language and inclusion: Schooling designed for dominant groups excludes other learners. Girls are particularly vulnerable because of their home responsibilities and the unsupportive attitudes of families and teachers.
  • Revitalising indigenous languages: Over the past 30 years there has been a blossoming of education approaches for and by indigenous peoples. Where there are bilingual and intercultural or multicultural programmes for indigenous peoples, indigenous students have achieved higher performance and attendance rates.
  • Bolivia revolutionises bilingual education: Intercultural and Bilingual Education supports the rights of indigenous school children to be taught in their own languages.
  • Policy and practice in Viet Nam: The government of Viet Nam recognises 54 minority ethnic groups and languages. It expresses strong commitment to the development of its ethnic minority communities, about 13 percent of the population which, however, have missed out on Viet Nam's dramatic economic growth.
  • Bridging languages in education: International awareness of the importance of Education for All has grown. Yet, the only schooling available in many non-dominant language communities uses a language students do not understand or speak to teach concepts that have very little to do with their way of life.
  • Mother tongue and bilingual education: Language education in Africa seldom provides a solid foundation for literacy and numeracy development. Instead of learning in a familiar language, pupils learn through an international language before they know it well enough.
  • Mother tongue education is cost-effective: Policymakers are often reluctant to support mother tongue as a medium of instruction in schools, arguing it is too expensive. Yet the savings can be significant.
  • Linguistic diversity and policy in India: India is a mosaic of linguistic diversity. of its 1,600 languages, grouped somewhat arbitrarily into 114 groups, has a clear majority. Yet children often start school in a language that is not their mother tongue.
Also available in French and Spanish

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