Newsletters

Newsletters 11 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 2008
Sustainable Development of Tourism (SDT)'s e-bulletin:

1

Read More
Year: 2008
This issue of id21 insights focuses on nutrition of women and children:
  • Improving the nutrition status of children and women: The high world food prices that we are currently experiencing provide a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of large parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to hunger and undernutrition
  • Why is undernutrition not a higher priority for donors? The prevention of chronic undernutrition is vital for reducing mortality and morbidity, for economic productivity, and for the respect and protection of human rights. Yet nutrition interventions tend to be low priorities for donors and developing country governments.
  • Strong public-private sector partnerships can help to reduce undernutrition: Global progress towards reducing undernutrition has been made through enlightened public policies, targeted development assistance, private sector actions and commitments from civil society. Yet every year, the deaths of more than 3.5 million children under the age of 5 can be attributed to undernutrition.
  • The success of salt iodisation: A shortage of iodine in a diet can cause cretinism, mental retardation and premature birth. These iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) can be eliminated by adding iodine to cooking salt.
  • The price of hunger: The first Millennium Development Goal – to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger – reflects the fact that undernutrition is both a symptom and a cause of poverty. The first measure of success is well known: to halve the number of people earning less than US$1 a day. The other – to halve the number of people suffering from inadequate food consumption – is equally important but less well known.
  • The persistence of child malnutrition in Africa: Malnutrition affects about 30 percent of children in Africa, caused by low birth weight and post-natal growth faltering. Child malnutrition is a persistent problem. The long term trend shows only slow improvement, and malnutrition rates worsen during droughts, economic crises, conflicts and displacement, and HIV.
  • Nutrition for mothers and children: Article 25.2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights establishes that motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. Yet maternal and child undernutrition are still highly prevalent in most developing countries.
  • Why have donors committed so few direct investments to eliminate child undernutrition? The mandate of most international donors is to reduce poverty, suffering and inequity. Addressing child undernutrition falls within this. However, current donor investment to directly address undernutrition is estimated to be well under half of the resources required.
  • What can be done to accelerate progress against undernutrition?  Many organisations work to eliminate undernutrition in children and pregnant and lactating women in developing countries. These organisations – international organisations, donors, academia, civil society and private sector – are loosely linked as an international nutrition system. However, this system is fragmented and dysfunctional.

  • Read More
Year: 2008
The Mountain Forum Bulletin focuses on the theme of climate change in mountains and adaptation to climate change
Year: 2007
In this issue of id21 insights, the focus is on health of mothers and babies:
  • Improving the health of mothers and babies - Breaking through health system constraints: Improving maternal health remains the most elusive of the Millennium Development Goals
  • Achieving universal coverage of maternal health care: Maternal health can only be improved if mothers receive care from pregnancy through to childbirth and beyond. For this to happen, health systems need to be strengthened with maternal, newborn and child health care at the core. For some countries this can be done relatively quickly, for others it will take far longer.
  • 'Too much care' threatens maternal health: Whilst the major focus of international advocacy and policy for maternal health is on enabling women to have access to skilled care during pregnancy and childbirth, some women face severe morbidity, even death, from an excess of maternity care.
  • The impact of maternal health on poverty: The links between poverty and poor maternal health are well established. Poorer countries experience the highest rates of maternal mortality, whilst maternal death and life-threatening and debilitating illness are higher among women from poorer households. However, there is now growing evidence that poor maternal health can also exacerbate poverty.
  • Shortages and shortcomings - The maternal health workforce crisis: Providing maternal care requires a viable and effective health workforce. In many countries, and certainly in all countries where maternal mortality is high, the size, skills and infrastructure of the workforce is inadequate.
  • Generating political priority to reduce maternal mortality: Why do some serious health issues receive significant attention from political leaders and others get very little? To achieve the Millennium Development Goal target of reducing maternal mortality, governments must prioritise this issue.
  • A forgotten priority - Maternal health service infrastructure: Weak health service infrastructure contributes to poor maternal health. Apart from inadequate skilled human resources, substandard infrastructure includes poor access to functioning equipment and a lack of essential drugs and supplies.

  • Read More
Year: 2007
This issue of id21 insights focuses on the quality of teachers:
  • More and better teachers needed - Achieving quality education for all: Eighteen million primary school teachers are needed over the next decade to meet Universal Primary Education (UPE) goals, says a recent report from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics
  • Effective professional development: Continuing — or in-service — professional development (CPD) for teachers is widely considered a critical condition for improved instructional quality and student learning.
  • Missing in action - Addressing teacher absenteeism: Getting teachers to come to work is a major barrier to improving education outcomes in some developing countries, especially in South Asia. Governments often spend 70 to 90 percent of their recurrent education budgets on teacher salaries, without the most basic of returns.
  • Changes in the primary teaching profession in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa: For many countries in sub-Saharan Africa achieving universal access to quality primary education has meant recruiting many more teachers at the same time as improving the quality of teaching.
  • Gender equality and HIV and AIDS in Uganda: HIV and AIDS widen existing inequalities of access to education for boys and girls. Research in Luweero district in central Uganda shows the negative impact of HIV and AIDS on primary school teachers and students in rural areas. Particular efforts are required to ensure that teachers can fulfil their potential to promote gender equality in schools.
  • Fighting for their lives - Political violence against teachers in Colombia: Awareness of the scale of human rights violations against Colombian trade unionists is growing. Of the 1,174 reported murders of trade unionists worldwide between 1999 and 2005, 860 were Colombian and half of these were teachers, according to the Colombian National Trade Union School.
  • Finding the pathway - Women teachers' aspirations in northern Pakistan: Women teachers face enormous cultural challenges in northern Pakistan. Research from the Aga Khan University explores women's experiences of trying to build teaching careers within this patriarchal society and looks at how they balance their multiple commitments.
Available also in French.

 

Read More
Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children's rights to learn in their own mother tongue:
  • Mother tongue first - Children's right to learn in their own languages: Education is power and language is the key to accessing that power
  • Linguistic genocide? Children's right to education in their own languages: We are killing languages faster than ever. By 2100, between 90 and 95 percent of today's approximately 7,000 spoken languages may be extinct or no longer learned by children.
  • Gender, language and inclusion: Schooling designed for dominant groups excludes other learners. Girls are particularly vulnerable because of their home responsibilities and the unsupportive attitudes of families and teachers.
  • Revitalising indigenous languages: Over the past 30 years there has been a blossoming of education approaches for and by indigenous peoples. Where there are bilingual and intercultural or multicultural programmes for indigenous peoples, indigenous students have achieved higher performance and attendance rates.
  • Bolivia revolutionises bilingual education: Intercultural and Bilingual Education supports the rights of indigenous school children to be taught in their own languages.
  • Policy and practice in Viet Nam: The government of Viet Nam recognises 54 minority ethnic groups and languages. It expresses strong commitment to the development of its ethnic minority communities, about 13 percent of the population which, however, have missed out on Viet Nam's dramatic economic growth.
  • Bridging languages in education: International awareness of the importance of Education for All has grown. Yet, the only schooling available in many non-dominant language communities uses a language students do not understand or speak to teach concepts that have very little to do with their way of life.
  • Mother tongue and bilingual education: Language education in Africa seldom provides a solid foundation for literacy and numeracy development. Instead of learning in a familiar language, pupils learn through an international language before they know it well enough.
  • Mother tongue education is cost-effective: Policymakers are often reluctant to support mother tongue as a medium of instruction in schools, arguing it is too expensive. Yet the savings can be significant.
  • Linguistic diversity and policy in India: India is a mosaic of linguistic diversity. of its 1,600 languages, grouped somewhat arbitrarily into 114 groups, has a clear majority. Yet children often start school in a language that is not their mother tongue.
Also available in French and Spanish

Read More
Year: 2006
The Bulletin includes articles on desertification and deserts in high altitude area of central Asia, the Andes, Africa, the Andes and Swiss Alps
Read More
Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children and poverty:
  • Make childhood poverty history: About 600 million children worldwide are growing up in absolute poverty
  • Economic policy must recognise children: Macroeconomic policies have powerful effects on children. They shape public spending on basic services such as education and health and influence how households respond to changing economic conditions, often in ways that are not good for children. Yet policy making on the whole does not recognise child well-being as an objective or an outcome. Pro-child interventions relating to economic growth, trade and macroeconomic policy are critical to overcoming poverty.
  • Educating women = healthier children? What is the best way to improve the health of a nation's children? Community healthcare facilities, water supplies and sewerage systems are traditional targets for public investment. Peru's experience suggests that improving women's education is just as important.
  • Children's issues ignored in Ethiopia's PRSP process: Donors, governments and other groups acknowledge that addressing childhood poverty and labour is an important part of broader poverty reduction efforts. Yet, policies with a more comprehensive approach to tackling the multi-dimensionality of child poverty are rarely included in national poverty strategies.
  • Cash transfers can reduce childhood poverty: Forty percent of children in developing countries struggle to survive on less than one US dollar a day, according to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Childhood poverty often leads to long term vulnerability. It is associated with lower educational attainment and schooling which affects future earning potential and well-being. Cash transfers can protect people's well-being as well enable them to invest in their future.
  • Monitoring budgets for child rights: The Bill of Rights in South Africa's constitution gives special consideration to child rights such as basic nutrition and education, health care and social services. Is it possible to ensure that these rights are realised?
  • Dynamics of child poverty in the Kyrgyz Republic: The Kyrgyz Republic is one of the smallest and least developed of the newly created independent states of the former Soviet Union. It ranks 110 out of the 177 countries on the Human Development Index (HDI). In the late 1990s, 88 percent of the population were living on less than US$ 4 per day. Children make up nearly two-fifths of its population but child poverty has received little attention.
  • Does child labour always undermine education? Children are often forced to work due to chronic poverty. Globally, work is the main occupation of almost 20 percent of all children aged under 15. This is considered a major obstacle to achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education by 2015.
  • ‘High achievers’ prioritise social policy: Costa Rica, Cuba, Barbados, Sri Lanka, South Korea, Malaysia, Mauritius, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Kerala (India) have succeeded in improving child welfare to a much higher level than might be expected given their national wealth. They are 'high-achievers' in social policy: in 50 years they have made advances in health and education that took 200 years in the industrialised world.

  • Read More
Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on education during times of emergencies:
  • Educating young people in emergencies - Time to end the neglect: Armed conflict and natural disasters tear communities apart
  • Applying minimum standards in Indonesia: For many humanitarian agencies, the tsunami in December 2004 tested their ability to assist in educating children on a massive scale. It also raised important challenges in applying the new Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction (MSEE) recently developed by the Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies.
  • New survey reveals major gaps in education: Most children and young people growing up in war zones miss out on education. Precise data, however, are lacking.
  • Life skills, peace education and AIDS prevention: Adolescents in post-conflict situations face many risks including HIV/AIDS and recruitment by fighting forces. Life skills training can add enormously to general education and provide support for emotional and social skills, particularly for HIV prevention and peace-building.
  • Young people speak out: Between 2000 and 2002 over150 adolescents led studies on the problems facing young people in Kosovo, northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, with the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children and other organisations. Despite the different stages of conflict and the diverse cultural, political and social backgrounds of the 3,000 adolescents and young adults interviewed, most said that education is critical to achieving physical protection, psychosocial recovery, peace and development.
  • Young people take the initiative: Young people in Africa face obstacles - poverty, war, discrimination - to a better life and to fulfilling their dreams. In frustration some resort to joining militias or becoming petty criminals or prostitutes in search of friendship, protection and food. The great majority do not want this, however; they want to get better educated and earn a living.
  • Make learning relevant, say young people: As thousands of Rwandans were killed or fled to neighbouring countries ten years ago, the international community provided primary school education in exile camps and local communities. Surveys by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) found that young people wanted to learn but felt that education is not available and that subjects taught are not relevant.
  • Civil war in Uganda - Education as a means of protection: Over 18 years of civil war in northern Uganda, fought mainly between the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the Ugandan military, has prevented young people from getting a good education. Over 90 percent of people live in camps for internally displaced persons and most schools in Kitgum and Pader districts are closed despite efforts to achieve Universal Primary Education
  • Post-primary education - Time to deliver: Primary education is increasingly seen as a priority on the same level as ‘life saving’ activities such as ensuring good health, adequate food supply and water and sanitation facilities. Most refugee camps have primary schools and many adolescents attend these classes. After primary, however, there is a mixed pattern of refugee education.
  • Young people reshape the future: Conflict has a devastating impact on education - it disrupts schooling and destroys educational infrastructure. Yet education systems are usually expected to contribute significantly to rebuilding shattered societies. They have to do this in a society suffering from the after effects of conflict and the psychological impact felt by pupils, teachers and communities. In post conflict situations, political authority and civil administration are often weak, compromised, or inexperienced; civil society is in disorder and financial resources limited.
  • Youth peace-building responds to inter-communal conflict: Peace-building programmes for young people are being pioneered to transform social relationships in countries and regions suffering long-standing conflict such as Northern Ireland, Cyprus, the Middle East, the Balkans, India and Pakistan: young people go to a neutral country where they are free from the pressures of conflict and violence.

  • Read More
Newsletters 11 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
email alert or subscribe to the RSS feed.