Newsletters

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Year: 2009
Articles in the Bulletin focus on the theme of mountain agriculture and include the following:
  • Recognising the amenities of mountain agriculture in Europe by Thomas Dax
  • Agricultural Diversity in Coping with Climate Change by Bandana Shakya
  • Livelihoods at Risk: Agricultural Viability and Converging Climatic and Economic Change in the Central Andes by Adam French and Jeffrey Bury
  • Traditional irrigation system: A case of Apatani tribe in Arunachal Himalaya, North East India by Mihin Dollo
  • Medicinal Plants in the Valais: A success story by Charly Darbellay
  • No Land Left for Women: Property Rights in Baltistan (Central Karakoram) by Nadine Guenther, Tine Maikowski & Matthias Schmidt
  • From subsistence to cash generating crops: a case study of changing cropping pattern in the Garhwal Himalaya, India Dr
  • Experiences in Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management in the mid-hills of Nepal: out-scaling the lessons Isabelle Providoli
  • Dzo: the mule of the Himalayas in a changing climate by Nakul Chettri
  • Women on forefront:  Conservation of Traditional Crop Biodiversity: A Study of Uttarakhand State in Indian Himalaya by Rajendra Prasad Juyal and Mahesh Chandra Sati
  • Nepal’s declining agriculture production in changing climate by Mohan Prasad Devkota and Ashok Kumar Koirala
  • Mountain Farming Support in Austria by Gerhard Hovorka and Thomas Dax
  • Himalayan Pastoralism by Naomi Bishop
  • Promoting Food Self-Sufficiency in the mid-hills of Nepal: fertilizers or farmyard manure? Prepared by the SDC-Helvetas-Intercooperation Sustainable Soil Management Programme, Nepal
  • Interview with Mr. Mahabir Pun, Chairman at E-network Research and Development
  • Film Screenings - An effective tool for Conservation Education by Nimesh Ved
  • Maintaining Agricultural Biodiversity in the European Mountain Regions: Alps, Carpathians and Balkans SAVE Monitoring Institute by Elli Broxham and Waltraud Kugler
  • World premiere of a high-realist portrait of the Cross River gorilla by African Conservation Foundation
  • Foundation for Sustainable Development in Mountain Regions (FDDM) by Eric Nanchen

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Year: 2008
In this newsletter, the UK charity CHANCE (Charity Helping the Advancement of Nepali Children's Education) describes athe current situation in Nepal including the political situation, as well as the disaster in the Koshi district
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Year: 2008
Articles include the following:
  • Earth Hour, the Power of One and Shaping Nepali Environmental Thinking by Surya B
  • The incongruity of territorial perceptions as obstacle to resource management in communal land – case study from southern Morocco by Manfred Finckh & Holger Kirscht
  • Gender Roles in Household Energy Management:  Issues and Implications by Ishari Mahat
  • Conflict in Kugha watershed by Farmer Tantoh
  • People’s Participation in Forest Resource Management in the Uttaranchal Himalaya by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Natural resource management based micro-enterprises development in the Garhwal Himalayas by Ashok Pokhriyal and Laxmi Prakash Semwal
  • Irrigation and an approach of sort in Peru by José Carvajal
  • Ancestral Bio-Indicators in Andean Highland Regions: Disaster warning and resilience mechanisms by Sergio Alvarez Gutierrez
  • Interview on Everest Eco-Expedition by Marianne Heredge and Ujol Sherchan
  • Signs of climate change on roof-top of the world by Tsewang Namgail
  • Book review on Ecology and Human Well-Being by Pushpam Kumar and B. Sudhakara Reddy
  • Forests, people and power edited by Oliver Springate-Baginski and Piers Blaikie
  • Seabuckthorn by Helga Ahmad
  • News from the Mountain Research Initiative: The Global Change Research Network in African Mountains by The Mountain Research Initiative
  • Visit to Harsing, a beautiful old tea garden in Darjeeling by Nirnay John Chettri
  • Energy Saving and Drudgery Reducing Technology Initiative by Jagriti
  • Resource Management: Conflict, Use and Role of Women by C.L.Chowdhary
  • Education in a remote hill district of Nepal: Deusa Secondary School, Solukhumbu by Marianne Heredge
  • Reconciling Community Development Needs and Great Apes Conservation: the twin-track approach by African Conservation Foundation
  • Revival of mountain tourism in earthquake affected areas of Kaghan Valley in Northern Pakistan by Aftab-ur-Rehman Rana
  • William L. Brown Center for Plant Genetic Resources
  • Centre for Mountain Studies: Scotland by Martin Price
  • From Spain: Update on RedMontañas activities by Manzanares el Real
  • SYFA Update by Farmer Tantoh
  • MSc Environment and Development of Mountainous Areas - National Technical University of Athens (N.T.U.A.)

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Year: 2007
This issue of id21 insights focuses on the quality of teachers:
  • More and better teachers needed - Achieving quality education for all: Eighteen million primary school teachers are needed over the next decade to meet Universal Primary Education (UPE) goals, says a recent report from the UNESCO Institute of Statistics
  • Effective professional development: Continuing — or in-service — professional development (CPD) for teachers is widely considered a critical condition for improved instructional quality and student learning.
  • Missing in action - Addressing teacher absenteeism: Getting teachers to come to work is a major barrier to improving education outcomes in some developing countries, especially in South Asia. Governments often spend 70 to 90 percent of their recurrent education budgets on teacher salaries, without the most basic of returns.
  • Changes in the primary teaching profession in French-speaking sub-Saharan Africa: For many countries in sub-Saharan Africa achieving universal access to quality primary education has meant recruiting many more teachers at the same time as improving the quality of teaching.
  • Gender equality and HIV and AIDS in Uganda: HIV and AIDS widen existing inequalities of access to education for boys and girls. Research in Luweero district in central Uganda shows the negative impact of HIV and AIDS on primary school teachers and students in rural areas. Particular efforts are required to ensure that teachers can fulfil their potential to promote gender equality in schools.
  • Fighting for their lives - Political violence against teachers in Colombia: Awareness of the scale of human rights violations against Colombian trade unionists is growing. Of the 1,174 reported murders of trade unionists worldwide between 1999 and 2005, 860 were Colombian and half of these were teachers, according to the Colombian National Trade Union School.
  • Finding the pathway - Women teachers' aspirations in northern Pakistan: Women teachers face enormous cultural challenges in northern Pakistan. Research from the Aga Khan University explores women's experiences of trying to build teaching careers within this patriarchal society and looks at how they balance their multiple commitments.
Available also in French.

 

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on remittances and how they can reduce poverty:
  • Sending money home: Can remittances reduce poverty?  At least US$232 billion will be sent back home globally by around 200 million migrants to their families in 2005, three times official development aid (US$78
  • Do remittances reduce poverty?  International remittances to developing countries will total around US$167 billion in 2005, more than twice official aid flows. Despite the ever-increasing size of international remittances, little attention has been paid to their effect on poverty and income distribution in developing countries and many policy questions remain unanswered.
  • Improving health and education: Remittances encourage investment in education and health, especially for children. New research suggests they can help families break the cycle of poverty and improve living conditions for future generations.
  • Boosting economic growth: Remittances by international migrants to their countries of origin constitute the largest source of external finance for developing economies after foreign direct investment (FDI). Estimated official remittances are US$167 billion for developing countries in 2005, double total development aid.
  • New regulations restrict Somali remittances: Approximately one million Somalis send US$1 billion back home every year, a crucial source of income for most of the Somali population. New regulations, however, as part of the 'war on terror', are restricting the flow of remittances into the country.
  • A better quality of life?  Remittances have an important role to play in the economic development of a country. Yet their impact is primarily seen at the regional and local level as a source of income to improve the wellbeing of thousands of households in migrant-sending countries.
  • Sending money home to Asia: Half the world's international migrants and most international labour migrants come from Asia. It is the main destination region for remittance flows from north to south, as well as within Asia from countries such as South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong and Thailand. The scale of remittances in Asia is unknown, however, and few policies exist to maximise their developmental impact.
  • Gender matters: Are remittance flows gender-neutral? Does it matter if the people involved in these transactions are male or female? Do remittances reshape gender relations?

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children's rights to learn in their own mother tongue:
  • Mother tongue first - Children's right to learn in their own languages: Education is power and language is the key to accessing that power
  • Linguistic genocide? Children's right to education in their own languages: We are killing languages faster than ever. By 2100, between 90 and 95 percent of today's approximately 7,000 spoken languages may be extinct or no longer learned by children.
  • Gender, language and inclusion: Schooling designed for dominant groups excludes other learners. Girls are particularly vulnerable because of their home responsibilities and the unsupportive attitudes of families and teachers.
  • Revitalising indigenous languages: Over the past 30 years there has been a blossoming of education approaches for and by indigenous peoples. Where there are bilingual and intercultural or multicultural programmes for indigenous peoples, indigenous students have achieved higher performance and attendance rates.
  • Bolivia revolutionises bilingual education: Intercultural and Bilingual Education supports the rights of indigenous school children to be taught in their own languages.
  • Policy and practice in Viet Nam: The government of Viet Nam recognises 54 minority ethnic groups and languages. It expresses strong commitment to the development of its ethnic minority communities, about 13 percent of the population which, however, have missed out on Viet Nam's dramatic economic growth.
  • Bridging languages in education: International awareness of the importance of Education for All has grown. Yet, the only schooling available in many non-dominant language communities uses a language students do not understand or speak to teach concepts that have very little to do with their way of life.
  • Mother tongue and bilingual education: Language education in Africa seldom provides a solid foundation for literacy and numeracy development. Instead of learning in a familiar language, pupils learn through an international language before they know it well enough.
  • Mother tongue education is cost-effective: Policymakers are often reluctant to support mother tongue as a medium of instruction in schools, arguing it is too expensive. Yet the savings can be significant.
  • Linguistic diversity and policy in India: India is a mosaic of linguistic diversity. of its 1,600 languages, grouped somewhat arbitrarily into 114 groups, has a clear majority. Yet children often start school in a language that is not their mother tongue.
Also available in French and Spanish

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Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on children and poverty:
  • Make childhood poverty history: About 600 million children worldwide are growing up in absolute poverty
  • Economic policy must recognise children: Macroeconomic policies have powerful effects on children. They shape public spending on basic services such as education and health and influence how households respond to changing economic conditions, often in ways that are not good for children. Yet policy making on the whole does not recognise child well-being as an objective or an outcome. Pro-child interventions relating to economic growth, trade and macroeconomic policy are critical to overcoming poverty.
  • Educating women = healthier children? What is the best way to improve the health of a nation's children? Community healthcare facilities, water supplies and sewerage systems are traditional targets for public investment. Peru's experience suggests that improving women's education is just as important.
  • Children's issues ignored in Ethiopia's PRSP process: Donors, governments and other groups acknowledge that addressing childhood poverty and labour is an important part of broader poverty reduction efforts. Yet, policies with a more comprehensive approach to tackling the multi-dimensionality of child poverty are rarely included in national poverty strategies.
  • Cash transfers can reduce childhood poverty: Forty percent of children in developing countries struggle to survive on less than one US dollar a day, according to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Childhood poverty often leads to long term vulnerability. It is associated with lower educational attainment and schooling which affects future earning potential and well-being. Cash transfers can protect people's well-being as well enable them to invest in their future.
  • Monitoring budgets for child rights: The Bill of Rights in South Africa's constitution gives special consideration to child rights such as basic nutrition and education, health care and social services. Is it possible to ensure that these rights are realised?
  • Dynamics of child poverty in the Kyrgyz Republic: The Kyrgyz Republic is one of the smallest and least developed of the newly created independent states of the former Soviet Union. It ranks 110 out of the 177 countries on the Human Development Index (HDI). In the late 1990s, 88 percent of the population were living on less than US$ 4 per day. Children make up nearly two-fifths of its population but child poverty has received little attention.
  • Does child labour always undermine education? Children are often forced to work due to chronic poverty. Globally, work is the main occupation of almost 20 percent of all children aged under 15. This is considered a major obstacle to achieving the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of universal primary education by 2015.
  • ‘High achievers’ prioritise social policy: Costa Rica, Cuba, Barbados, Sri Lanka, South Korea, Malaysia, Mauritius, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Kerala (India) have succeeded in improving child welfare to a much higher level than might be expected given their national wealth. They are 'high-achievers' in social policy: in 50 years they have made advances in health and education that took 200 years in the industrialised world.

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Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on education during times of emergencies:
  • Educating young people in emergencies - Time to end the neglect: Armed conflict and natural disasters tear communities apart
  • Applying minimum standards in Indonesia: For many humanitarian agencies, the tsunami in December 2004 tested their ability to assist in educating children on a massive scale. It also raised important challenges in applying the new Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction (MSEE) recently developed by the Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies.
  • New survey reveals major gaps in education: Most children and young people growing up in war zones miss out on education. Precise data, however, are lacking.
  • Life skills, peace education and AIDS prevention: Adolescents in post-conflict situations face many risks including HIV/AIDS and recruitment by fighting forces. Life skills training can add enormously to general education and provide support for emotional and social skills, particularly for HIV prevention and peace-building.
  • Young people speak out: Between 2000 and 2002 over150 adolescents led studies on the problems facing young people in Kosovo, northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, with the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children and other organisations. Despite the different stages of conflict and the diverse cultural, political and social backgrounds of the 3,000 adolescents and young adults interviewed, most said that education is critical to achieving physical protection, psychosocial recovery, peace and development.
  • Young people take the initiative: Young people in Africa face obstacles - poverty, war, discrimination - to a better life and to fulfilling their dreams. In frustration some resort to joining militias or becoming petty criminals or prostitutes in search of friendship, protection and food. The great majority do not want this, however; they want to get better educated and earn a living.
  • Make learning relevant, say young people: As thousands of Rwandans were killed or fled to neighbouring countries ten years ago, the international community provided primary school education in exile camps and local communities. Surveys by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) found that young people wanted to learn but felt that education is not available and that subjects taught are not relevant.
  • Civil war in Uganda - Education as a means of protection: Over 18 years of civil war in northern Uganda, fought mainly between the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the Ugandan military, has prevented young people from getting a good education. Over 90 percent of people live in camps for internally displaced persons and most schools in Kitgum and Pader districts are closed despite efforts to achieve Universal Primary Education
  • Post-primary education - Time to deliver: Primary education is increasingly seen as a priority on the same level as ‘life saving’ activities such as ensuring good health, adequate food supply and water and sanitation facilities. Most refugee camps have primary schools and many adolescents attend these classes. After primary, however, there is a mixed pattern of refugee education.
  • Young people reshape the future: Conflict has a devastating impact on education - it disrupts schooling and destroys educational infrastructure. Yet education systems are usually expected to contribute significantly to rebuilding shattered societies. They have to do this in a society suffering from the after effects of conflict and the psychological impact felt by pupils, teachers and communities. In post conflict situations, political authority and civil administration are often weak, compromised, or inexperienced; civil society is in disorder and financial resources limited.
  • Youth peace-building responds to inter-communal conflict: Peace-building programmes for young people are being pioneered to transform social relationships in countries and regions suffering long-standing conflict such as Northern Ireland, Cyprus, the Middle East, the Balkans, India and Pakistan: young people go to a neutral country where they are free from the pressures of conflict and violence.

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