Newsletters

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Year: 2008
Articles include the following:
  • Earth Hour, the Power of One and Shaping Nepali Environmental Thinking by Surya B
  • The incongruity of territorial perceptions as obstacle to resource management in communal land – case study from southern Morocco by Manfred Finckh & Holger Kirscht
  • Gender Roles in Household Energy Management:  Issues and Implications by Ishari Mahat
  • Conflict in Kugha watershed by Farmer Tantoh
  • People’s Participation in Forest Resource Management in the Uttaranchal Himalaya by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Natural resource management based micro-enterprises development in the Garhwal Himalayas by Ashok Pokhriyal and Laxmi Prakash Semwal
  • Irrigation and an approach of sort in Peru by José Carvajal
  • Ancestral Bio-Indicators in Andean Highland Regions: Disaster warning and resilience mechanisms by Sergio Alvarez Gutierrez
  • Interview on Everest Eco-Expedition by Marianne Heredge and Ujol Sherchan
  • Signs of climate change on roof-top of the world by Tsewang Namgail
  • Book review on Ecology and Human Well-Being by Pushpam Kumar and B. Sudhakara Reddy
  • Forests, people and power edited by Oliver Springate-Baginski and Piers Blaikie
  • Seabuckthorn by Helga Ahmad
  • News from the Mountain Research Initiative: The Global Change Research Network in African Mountains by The Mountain Research Initiative
  • Visit to Harsing, a beautiful old tea garden in Darjeeling by Nirnay John Chettri
  • Energy Saving and Drudgery Reducing Technology Initiative by Jagriti
  • Resource Management: Conflict, Use and Role of Women by C.L.Chowdhary
  • Education in a remote hill district of Nepal: Deusa Secondary School, Solukhumbu by Marianne Heredge
  • Reconciling Community Development Needs and Great Apes Conservation: the twin-track approach by African Conservation Foundation
  • Revival of mountain tourism in earthquake affected areas of Kaghan Valley in Northern Pakistan by Aftab-ur-Rehman Rana
  • William L. Brown Center for Plant Genetic Resources
  • Centre for Mountain Studies: Scotland by Martin Price
  • From Spain: Update on RedMontañas activities by Manzanares el Real
  • SYFA Update by Farmer Tantoh
  • MSc Environment and Development of Mountainous Areas - National Technical University of Athens (N.T.U.A.)

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Year: 2006
This issue of id21 insight focuses on pro-poor tourism and how far it really helps the poor:
  • How pro-poor is tourism? New practices can reduce poverty: Pro-poor tourism should increase the benefits of the tourism industry for poor people
  • Can the private sector mainstream pro-poor tourism? Businesses run tourism, from micro-enterprises to multinational companies. How companies conduct their business influences how far poor people benefit from tourism.
  • Black Economic Empowerment - The South African approach: Inequality and unemployment still largely occurs along racial lines in South Africa, despite the end of apartheid. The government is addressing this by promoting Black Economic Empowerment throughout the economy.Pro-poor tourism is part of this.
  • Government support in Lao PDR - How effective is it? Foreign exchange from tourism (over US$ 146 million in 2005) significantly benefits the national economy in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). This money stimulates local production and consumption in many sectors, including transport, agriculture and education, but does it benefit poor people?
  • Linkages and leakages - Local supply and imports: Tourism is a major global industry, but is it good for developing countries? Since long-haul tourism to developing countries started in the late 1960s, many commentators have persistently claimed that tourism scarcely benefits the hosts. One suggested problem is the high level of leakages out of the destination country.
  • Can all-inclusive tourism be pro-poor? A key aspect of pro-poor tourism is creating and - more importantly - maintaining employment opportunities for poor communities. All-inclusive tourism businesses and large hotels can provide jobs in developing countries. As such, they have a potentially important role in pro-poor tourism.
  • Community-based tourism - Failing to deliver? Community-based tourism was a popular intervention during the 'ecotourism' boom of the 1990s. It is now being suggested as a form of pro-poor tourism. However, few projects have generated sufficient benefits to either provide incentives for conservation - the objective of ecotourism - or contribute to local poverty reduction.

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Year: 2005
In this issue of id21, the focus is on people living in protected areas:
  • People and protected areas: New agendas for conservation: For many threatened plants and animals, protected areas are a vital refuge in the face of declining natural habitats
  • Making waves: Protecting marine and coastal areas involves many similar issues to terrestrial protected areas, including balancing conservation and development needs and managing tradeoffs between multiple users. However, they also present unique challenges: they often cross international boundaries and the high mobility or migration of many marine species makes protection beyond boundaries difficult.
  • Is forced displacement acceptable in conservation projects? Over ten million people have been displaced from protected areas by conservation projects. Forced displacement in developing countries is a major obstacle to reducing poverty. It should no longer be considered a mainstream strategy for conservation and only applied in extreme cases following international standards.
  • Learning to learn: Societies place a high value on addressing two of the world's most pressing problems - alleviating poverty and protecting the world's biological diversity. A lot of money has been spent on these two objectives, international treaties have been signed and countless organisations have devoted time to implementing funds in projects.
  • Protecting nature, culture and people: Indigenous peoples' traditional ownership and use of land and resources has often been eroded by protected areas. Their consent has rarely been sought for establishing protected areas on their lands, nor have they received adequate compensation. But are conservation organisations and government protected area agencies beginning to recognise the important role these peoples can play?
  • Agriculture vs protected areas: Agriculturalists strive to increase crop production to provide poor communities with incomes and a secure food supply whilst environmentalists want to expand protected areas and reduce the intensity of farming.
  • Tourism in Nepal: Tourism in the Greater Himalaya supports the local economy with foreign exchange and by creating opportunities for local employment. Mass and unregulated tourism, however, can cause environmental damage, particularly in ecologically fragile areas. Is ecotourism - responsible travel that aims to conserve the environment and improve local people's welfare - an effective compromise?
  • Governance of protected areas: The 2003 World Parks Congress and 2004 Programme of Work on Protected Areas of the Convention on Biological Diversity brought unprecedented attention to the concept of governance of protected areas, with crucial implications for conservation worldwide.

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