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Newsletters 18 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
Year: 2010
Ang Nima Sherpa, chairman of Khumbu Alpine Conservation and Restoration Program in the Khumbu region, celebrates a successful year and a time of new beginnings for Khumbu Alpine Conservation Council (KACC)
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Year: 2010
Director Brian Peniston from the Mountain Institute writes about news from the field
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Year: 2009
Autumn of 2009 has been a busy and productive time for The Mountain Institute’s Asia Regional Office
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Year: 2009
Due to severe winter drought, 700,000 people in the Mid- and Far-Western Hills and Mountains are in need of immediate food assistance in addition to nearly one million people who are currently supported by WFP
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Year: 2009
Articles in the Bulletin focus on the theme of mountain agriculture and include the following:
  • Recognising the amenities of mountain agriculture in Europe by Thomas Dax
  • Agricultural Diversity in Coping with Climate Change by Bandana Shakya
  • Livelihoods at Risk: Agricultural Viability and Converging Climatic and Economic Change in the Central Andes by Adam French and Jeffrey Bury
  • Traditional irrigation system: A case of Apatani tribe in Arunachal Himalaya, North East India by Mihin Dollo
  • Medicinal Plants in the Valais: A success story by Charly Darbellay
  • No Land Left for Women: Property Rights in Baltistan (Central Karakoram) by Nadine Guenther, Tine Maikowski & Matthias Schmidt
  • From subsistence to cash generating crops: a case study of changing cropping pattern in the Garhwal Himalaya, India Dr
  • Experiences in Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management in the mid-hills of Nepal: out-scaling the lessons Isabelle Providoli
  • Dzo: the mule of the Himalayas in a changing climate by Nakul Chettri
  • Women on forefront:  Conservation of Traditional Crop Biodiversity: A Study of Uttarakhand State in Indian Himalaya by Rajendra Prasad Juyal and Mahesh Chandra Sati
  • Nepal’s declining agriculture production in changing climate by Mohan Prasad Devkota and Ashok Kumar Koirala
  • Mountain Farming Support in Austria by Gerhard Hovorka and Thomas Dax
  • Himalayan Pastoralism by Naomi Bishop
  • Promoting Food Self-Sufficiency in the mid-hills of Nepal: fertilizers or farmyard manure? Prepared by the SDC-Helvetas-Intercooperation Sustainable Soil Management Programme, Nepal
  • Interview with Mr. Mahabir Pun, Chairman at E-network Research and Development
  • Film Screenings - An effective tool for Conservation Education by Nimesh Ved
  • Maintaining Agricultural Biodiversity in the European Mountain Regions: Alps, Carpathians and Balkans SAVE Monitoring Institute by Elli Broxham and Waltraud Kugler
  • World premiere of a high-realist portrait of the Cross River gorilla by African Conservation Foundation
  • Foundation for Sustainable Development in Mountain Regions (FDDM) by Eric Nanchen

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Year: 2008
In this newsletter, the UK charity CHANCE (Charity Helping the Advancement of Nepali Children's Education) describes athe current situation in Nepal including the political situation, as well as the disaster in the Koshi district
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Year: 2008
Articles include the following:
  • Earth Hour, the Power of One and Shaping Nepali Environmental Thinking by Surya B
  • The incongruity of territorial perceptions as obstacle to resource management in communal land – case study from southern Morocco by Manfred Finckh & Holger Kirscht
  • Gender Roles in Household Energy Management:  Issues and Implications by Ishari Mahat
  • Conflict in Kugha watershed by Farmer Tantoh
  • People’s Participation in Forest Resource Management in the Uttaranchal Himalaya by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Natural resource management based micro-enterprises development in the Garhwal Himalayas by Ashok Pokhriyal and Laxmi Prakash Semwal
  • Irrigation and an approach of sort in Peru by José Carvajal
  • Ancestral Bio-Indicators in Andean Highland Regions: Disaster warning and resilience mechanisms by Sergio Alvarez Gutierrez
  • Interview on Everest Eco-Expedition by Marianne Heredge and Ujol Sherchan
  • Signs of climate change on roof-top of the world by Tsewang Namgail
  • Book review on Ecology and Human Well-Being by Pushpam Kumar and B. Sudhakara Reddy
  • Forests, people and power edited by Oliver Springate-Baginski and Piers Blaikie
  • Seabuckthorn by Helga Ahmad
  • News from the Mountain Research Initiative: The Global Change Research Network in African Mountains by The Mountain Research Initiative
  • Visit to Harsing, a beautiful old tea garden in Darjeeling by Nirnay John Chettri
  • Energy Saving and Drudgery Reducing Technology Initiative by Jagriti
  • Resource Management: Conflict, Use and Role of Women by C.L.Chowdhary
  • Education in a remote hill district of Nepal: Deusa Secondary School, Solukhumbu by Marianne Heredge
  • Reconciling Community Development Needs and Great Apes Conservation: the twin-track approach by African Conservation Foundation
  • Revival of mountain tourism in earthquake affected areas of Kaghan Valley in Northern Pakistan by Aftab-ur-Rehman Rana
  • William L. Brown Center for Plant Genetic Resources
  • Centre for Mountain Studies: Scotland by Martin Price
  • From Spain: Update on RedMontañas activities by Manzanares el Real
  • SYFA Update by Farmer Tantoh
  • MSc Environment and Development of Mountainous Areas - National Technical University of Athens (N.T.U.A.)

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Year: 2008
The Mountain Forum Bulletin focuses on the theme of climate change in mountains and adaptation to climate change
Year: 2007
This issue of id21 insights focuses on innovation for poor people:
  • Towards pro-poor innovation - Putting public value into science and technology: We live in a rapidly changing world
  • Biotechnology in Bangalore - The politics of innovation: Bangalore in Karnataka, southern India, has become an iconic technology capital, fuelled by massively successful software and technology industries. Many people see it as a taste of Asia's future, where the old concerns of 'development' are banished by a high-growth knowledge economy.
  • Nano-dialogues - Helping scientists to meet poor people's needs: Researchers from Demos, Practical Action and the University of Lancaster collaborated on a project designed to engage Zimbabwean community groups and scientists, from both the North and South, in debates about new nano-technologies. The dialogue was one of four experiments in public engagement with nanotechnologies, known as the nano-dialogues, funded by the Sciencewise programme of the UK Office of Science and Technology.
  • Supporting local innovation in Nepal: For poor and vulnerable rural communities, innovating through local experimentation and adaptation in farming and other practices is an important means of survival. How can local innovation be fostered and valued alongside the wider development of high technology, which is commonly associated with globalisation?
  • China: the next science superpower?  China in 2007 is the world's largest technocracy: a country ruled by scientists and engineers who believe in the power of new technologies to deliver social and economic progress.
  • Enhancing rural livelihoods: The role of ICTs: Access, empowerment and individual champions are all essential ingredients for creating a local environment in which Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) can contribute to rural livelihoods.
  • Case Study - Social entrepreneurship in Kenya: Technological innovation and entrepreneurship are crucial to development. A new entrepreneurial approach to development is emerging. This involves designing new technologies and adapting existing ones to suit the specific requirements of poor people. These are then bought by poor people to form the basis of small businesses or used to help people meet their basic human needs.
  • Threats, opportunities and incentives for pro-poor innovation: Many advocates of pro-poor innovation fear a globalised world that is exploited by large corporate enterprises and powerful countries, now including China and India. Perceived threats include loss of local knowledge and powerlessness of low income economies and their enterprises in the face of cheap goods produced elsewhere. Pro-poor innovations, such as drought- or disease-resistant crops or effective and cheap drugs are often not prioritised.

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Newsletters 18 records found  1 - 10next  jump to record: Search took 0.01 seconds. 
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