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Year: 2009
Articles in this edition of the Mountain Forum Bulletin include:
  • Mountain Diversity - A Global Heritage - Eva M
  • Are Ethiopian Highlands changing? Amphibians as Ecosystem Indicators - Simon Loader, Abebe Mengistu, Silvia Schwaller, David Gower, Peter Nagel, Abebe Getahun, Samy Saber and Roman Kassahun
  • PARADISE LOST? Conservation of Mount Marsabit Forest Ecosystem, Northern Kenya - Wario R. Adano
  • Responses to Threats and Impacts on the Outstanding Biodiversity Values of Low-Altitude Mountains in South Western Australia - Anne Cochrane, Sarah Barrett and John Watson
  • Impacts of Armed Conflict on Mountain Biodiversity: Experiences from Nepal - Bishnu Upreti
  • Conservation of Agrobiodiversity through Traditionally Cultivating ‘Barahnaja’ in the Garhwal Himalaya, India - Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Biodiversity Conservation and Crop Improvement in a Fragile Agro-Ecosystem: Insights from Guangxi, China - Song Yiching, Zhang Shihuang, with Ronnie Vernooy
  • Intensified Sheep Grazing Decreases the Biodiversity of Alpine Grasslands in the Carpathians, Romania - Bruno Baur
  • Main Threats to Mountain Biodiversity in Georgia - George Nakhutsrishvili, Maia Akhalkatsi and Otar Abdaladze
  • Recent Change of Alpine Vegetation and Plant Species Richness in the Swedish Scandes - Leif Kullman
  • Mountain Biodiversity, Genetic Resources and Cultures - Promila Kapoor-Vijay
  • Spread of Non-Native Plant Species into Mountains: Now is the Time to Act - Keith McDougall, Sylvia Haider, Tim Seipel, Christoph Kueffer and MIREN Consortium
  • Changes in Biodiversity Patterns in the High Andes - Understanding the Consequences and Seeking Adaptation to Global Change - Anton Seimon, Karina Yager , Tracie Seimon, Steve Schmidt, Alfredo Grau, Stephan Beck, Carolina García, Alfredo Tupayachi, Preston Sowell, Jerry Touval and Stephan Halloy
  • Protection of the Cloud Forests and Their Biodiversity in the Coastal Cordillera of Venezuela - Winfried Meier
  • Transboundary Landscape Conservation in the Eastern Himalaya – Interview with Dr. Nakul Chettri - Samuel Thomas and Ujol Sherchan
  • Global Mountain Biodiversity - Eva Spehn
  • Global Change in Mountain Regions: The Mountain Research Initiative - Claudia Drexler
  • ICIMOD’s International Conference, Workshops on Mountain Biodiversity - ICIMOD
  • Photo Exhibition: Changing Landscapes - Nonna Lamponen
  • Biodiversity and Climate Change Research Programme of the Snow and Mountain Research Centre of Andorra (CENMA) - Marta Doménech
  • Climate Change and Biodiversity in the European Union Overseas Entities - Guilluame Prudent
  • Caribou of the Canadian Rockies: Understanding Environmental Change in the Context of Conservation and Evolution - Byron Weckworth
  • Thoughts on the Food Crisis in the Andes - Judith Kuan Cubillas, Consultora de CONDESAN
  • Invertebrate Monitoring at GLORIA Target Regions: The First Results From the Urals and Need for Global Networking - Yuri Mikhailov
  • Walking through My Land: A Little Sparrow - Walter Bishop V.
  • Metsovion Interdisciplinary Research Centre Database (MIRC)
  • Angeliki Geronteli, on behalf of the N.T .U.A., M.I.R.C
  • Technological Innovation Servicing Biodiversity - Lourdes Chuquipiondo (RAMP PERU)
  • Birds from the Albertine Rift - Michel Louette (RMCA)
  • Agrobiodiversity in the Alps: Establishment of a Long-Term Monitoring System - Elli Broxham
  • Project Snow Leopard: Participatory Conservation Model for the Indian Himalaya - Pranav Trivedi
  • The Importance of Mediterranean Alpine Biodiversity in Central Spain - Rosario Gavilán and Alba Gutiérrez Girón
  • New Views of the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya for Conserving Biodiversity - Daniel J. Miller
  • Vegetation Types of the Endangered Eastern Ghats Mountain Ecosystem in Southern Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu, India - G Areendran, Prakash Rao and Krishna Raj
  • Useful Resources for Mountain Biodiversity
  • Mountain Calendar

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Year: 2008
This issue of id21 insights focuses on nutrition of women and children:
  • Improving the nutrition status of children and women: The high world food prices that we are currently experiencing provide a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of large parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia to hunger and undernutrition
  • Why is undernutrition not a higher priority for donors? The prevention of chronic undernutrition is vital for reducing mortality and morbidity, for economic productivity, and for the respect and protection of human rights. Yet nutrition interventions tend to be low priorities for donors and developing country governments.
  • Strong public-private sector partnerships can help to reduce undernutrition: Global progress towards reducing undernutrition has been made through enlightened public policies, targeted development assistance, private sector actions and commitments from civil society. Yet every year, the deaths of more than 3.5 million children under the age of 5 can be attributed to undernutrition.
  • The success of salt iodisation: A shortage of iodine in a diet can cause cretinism, mental retardation and premature birth. These iodine deficiency disorders (IDD) can be eliminated by adding iodine to cooking salt.
  • The price of hunger: The first Millennium Development Goal – to eradicate extreme poverty and hunger – reflects the fact that undernutrition is both a symptom and a cause of poverty. The first measure of success is well known: to halve the number of people earning less than US$1 a day. The other – to halve the number of people suffering from inadequate food consumption – is equally important but less well known.
  • The persistence of child malnutrition in Africa: Malnutrition affects about 30 percent of children in Africa, caused by low birth weight and post-natal growth faltering. Child malnutrition is a persistent problem. The long term trend shows only slow improvement, and malnutrition rates worsen during droughts, economic crises, conflicts and displacement, and HIV.
  • Nutrition for mothers and children: Article 25.2 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights establishes that motherhood and childhood are entitled to special care and assistance. Yet maternal and child undernutrition are still highly prevalent in most developing countries.
  • Why have donors committed so few direct investments to eliminate child undernutrition? The mandate of most international donors is to reduce poverty, suffering and inequity. Addressing child undernutrition falls within this. However, current donor investment to directly address undernutrition is estimated to be well under half of the resources required.
  • What can be done to accelerate progress against undernutrition?  Many organisations work to eliminate undernutrition in children and pregnant and lactating women in developing countries. These organisations – international organisations, donors, academia, civil society and private sector – are loosely linked as an international nutrition system. However, this system is fragmented and dysfunctional.

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Year: 2008
Articles include the following:
  • Earth Hour, the Power of One and Shaping Nepali Environmental Thinking by Surya B
  • The incongruity of territorial perceptions as obstacle to resource management in communal land – case study from southern Morocco by Manfred Finckh & Holger Kirscht
  • Gender Roles in Household Energy Management:  Issues and Implications by Ishari Mahat
  • Conflict in Kugha watershed by Farmer Tantoh
  • People’s Participation in Forest Resource Management in the Uttaranchal Himalaya by Vishwambhar Prasad Sati
  • Natural resource management based micro-enterprises development in the Garhwal Himalayas by Ashok Pokhriyal and Laxmi Prakash Semwal
  • Irrigation and an approach of sort in Peru by José Carvajal
  • Ancestral Bio-Indicators in Andean Highland Regions: Disaster warning and resilience mechanisms by Sergio Alvarez Gutierrez
  • Interview on Everest Eco-Expedition by Marianne Heredge and Ujol Sherchan
  • Signs of climate change on roof-top of the world by Tsewang Namgail
  • Book review on Ecology and Human Well-Being by Pushpam Kumar and B. Sudhakara Reddy
  • Forests, people and power edited by Oliver Springate-Baginski and Piers Blaikie
  • Seabuckthorn by Helga Ahmad
  • News from the Mountain Research Initiative: The Global Change Research Network in African Mountains by The Mountain Research Initiative
  • Visit to Harsing, a beautiful old tea garden in Darjeeling by Nirnay John Chettri
  • Energy Saving and Drudgery Reducing Technology Initiative by Jagriti
  • Resource Management: Conflict, Use and Role of Women by C.L.Chowdhary
  • Education in a remote hill district of Nepal: Deusa Secondary School, Solukhumbu by Marianne Heredge
  • Reconciling Community Development Needs and Great Apes Conservation: the twin-track approach by African Conservation Foundation
  • Revival of mountain tourism in earthquake affected areas of Kaghan Valley in Northern Pakistan by Aftab-ur-Rehman Rana
  • William L. Brown Center for Plant Genetic Resources
  • Centre for Mountain Studies: Scotland by Martin Price
  • From Spain: Update on RedMontañas activities by Manzanares el Real
  • SYFA Update by Farmer Tantoh
  • MSc Environment and Development of Mountainous Areas - National Technical University of Athens (N.T.U.A.)

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Year: 2008
The Mountain Forum Bulletin focuses on the theme of climate change in mountains and adaptation to climate change
Year: 2007
Income from illegal opium poppy cultivation helps sustain the livelihoods of millions of rural Afghans, but also provides significant revenues to criminals and armed groups fighting the government
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Year: 2005
In this issue of id21 insights, articles focus on the role of community radio:
  • Voices for change - Tuning in to community radio: The impact of new information and communication technologies on development is a subject of extensive international debate, particularly at the United Nations World Summit on the Information Society
  • Step by step: towards legislation and practice in India: More than a decade after the Indian Supreme Court judged that 'airwaves are public property', national laws still prohibit genuine community radio broadcasting. Residential universities and educational institutions, however, can apply for broadcasting licenses. Although the government refers to these as community radio stations and they transmit beyond their campuses, they are in fact campus radio. While this indicates change at policy levels, the crucial question for India now is: how soon will community radio follow?
  • Legalising community radio in Mexico: The struggle for community radio's legal recognition in Mexico began in 2002, when several unlicensed community radio stations came under threat. The book Con Permiso describes and analyses the process through which community radio in Mexico obtained legal recognition, despite opposition from the owners of the most powerful commercial media in the country, Televisa and TV Azteca.
  • Colombian radio thrives in armed conflict: Tiny radio stations and other media initiatives managed by citizens’ groups are operating successfully in regions where leftist guerrilla organisations, right-wing paramilitary groups, drug traffickers and the Colombian army have a strong presence. The University of Oklahoma in the USA, Magdalena Medio Community Radio Stations Association (AREDMAG), Universidad Javeriana and Universidad del Norte in Colombia have examined citizens’ media in areas of armed conflict. Initiatives are achieving significant results and transforming communities living in difficult circumstances.
  • Sustainability is not just about money: Sustainability is too often associated solely with funding. Community media projects are considered 'sustainable' - and therefore 'successful' - when they manage to finance their operations. Little attention has been given to other crucial aspects of sustainability: institutional and social. Money is important, but the main pillar that sustains community media is its community's participation.
  • Community Multimedia Centres provide development services: Community Multimedia Centres (CMCs) combine community radio and telecentre services to form a comprehensive information and communication platform serving local development needs. Launched in 2001 by UNESCO, today there are over 50 centres in Africa, Asia and the Caribbean and scale-up projects are underway in Mali, Mozambique and Senegal.
  • New voices in Indonesia - Challenges and opportunities: The Indonesian government acknowledged the existence of community radio stations with the ratification of the Broadcasting Law in 2002. There are still constraints to their smooth functioning, however, in particular unclear regulation and low-skilled community radio activists. They also remain in an inferior position to commercial broadcasters, for whom community radio stations are potential competitors. Yet, community radio in Indonesia has helped improve democratic processes and promote local culture.
  • Radio assesses community change in Mozambique: An expanding network of community radios is strengthening civil society and supporting community development and social change in Mozambique. The increase from one community radio station in 1994 to nearly fifty in 2005 means that more than a third of the population now lives within reach of a station. Regular, sustainable, impact assessments are essential if these stations are to be effective.
  • Lessons for localising development: Do community radio stations cover development issues? Is there a real link between the participation and social mobilisation effects associated with community radio and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)?

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Year: 2005
This issue of id21 insights focuses on education during times of emergencies:
  • Educating young people in emergencies - Time to end the neglect: Armed conflict and natural disasters tear communities apart
  • Applying minimum standards in Indonesia: For many humanitarian agencies, the tsunami in December 2004 tested their ability to assist in educating children on a massive scale. It also raised important challenges in applying the new Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction (MSEE) recently developed by the Inter-Agency Network on Education in Emergencies.
  • New survey reveals major gaps in education: Most children and young people growing up in war zones miss out on education. Precise data, however, are lacking.
  • Life skills, peace education and AIDS prevention: Adolescents in post-conflict situations face many risks including HIV/AIDS and recruitment by fighting forces. Life skills training can add enormously to general education and provide support for emotional and social skills, particularly for HIV prevention and peace-building.
  • Young people speak out: Between 2000 and 2002 over150 adolescents led studies on the problems facing young people in Kosovo, northern Uganda and Sierra Leone, with the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children and other organisations. Despite the different stages of conflict and the diverse cultural, political and social backgrounds of the 3,000 adolescents and young adults interviewed, most said that education is critical to achieving physical protection, psychosocial recovery, peace and development.
  • Young people take the initiative: Young people in Africa face obstacles - poverty, war, discrimination - to a better life and to fulfilling their dreams. In frustration some resort to joining militias or becoming petty criminals or prostitutes in search of friendship, protection and food. The great majority do not want this, however; they want to get better educated and earn a living.
  • Make learning relevant, say young people: As thousands of Rwandans were killed or fled to neighbouring countries ten years ago, the international community provided primary school education in exile camps and local communities. Surveys by the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) found that young people wanted to learn but felt that education is not available and that subjects taught are not relevant.
  • Civil war in Uganda - Education as a means of protection: Over 18 years of civil war in northern Uganda, fought mainly between the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) and the Ugandan military, has prevented young people from getting a good education. Over 90 percent of people live in camps for internally displaced persons and most schools in Kitgum and Pader districts are closed despite efforts to achieve Universal Primary Education
  • Post-primary education - Time to deliver: Primary education is increasingly seen as a priority on the same level as ‘life saving’ activities such as ensuring good health, adequate food supply and water and sanitation facilities. Most refugee camps have primary schools and many adolescents attend these classes. After primary, however, there is a mixed pattern of refugee education.
  • Young people reshape the future: Conflict has a devastating impact on education - it disrupts schooling and destroys educational infrastructure. Yet education systems are usually expected to contribute significantly to rebuilding shattered societies. They have to do this in a society suffering from the after effects of conflict and the psychological impact felt by pupils, teachers and communities. In post conflict situations, political authority and civil administration are often weak, compromised, or inexperienced; civil society is in disorder and financial resources limited.
  • Youth peace-building responds to inter-communal conflict: Peace-building programmes for young people are being pioneered to transform social relationships in countries and regions suffering long-standing conflict such as Northern Ireland, Cyprus, the Middle East, the Balkans, India and Pakistan: young people go to a neutral country where they are free from the pressures of conflict and violence.

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Year: 2002
The second issue of Policy Matters in the programme of CEESP highlights new findings and hopes on a very old dilemma: are we condemned for ever to facing destructive conflicts over natural resources?

Is there a chance to replace such conflicts with security and mutual cooperation among the actors advancing entitlements and claims?

'Environment and Security' is an emerging field with great promise

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Year: 1999
Depending on one's point of view, climate change is a serious global threat, a multi-billion dollar research industry, the subject of endless negotiations and lobbying, a potential source of North-South conflict, or a new basis for North-South co-operation
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