000007214 001__ 7214
000007214 041__ $$aEnglish
000007214 100__ $$aThe Economist
000007214 245__ $$aAdapting to climate change: Facing the consequences
000007214 260__ $$c25 November 2010
000007214 300__ $$amult. p
000007214 507__ $$aNews article
000007214 520__ $$aThe world warmed by about 0.7°C in the 20th century. Every year in this century has been warmer than all but one in the last (1998, since you ask). If carbon-dioxide levels were magically to stabilise where they are now (almost 390 parts per million, 40% more than before the industrial revolution) the world would probably warm by a further half a degree or so as the ocean, which is slow to change its temperature, caught up. But CO2 levels continue to rise. Despite 20 years of climate negotiation, the world is still on an emissions trajectory that fits pretty easily into the “business as usual” scenarios drawn up by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
000007214 653__ $$aglobal warming
000007214 653__ $$aIPCC
000007214 650__ $$aClimate Change
000007214 650__ $$aAdaptation
000007214 650__ $$aMitigation
000007214 8564_ $$uhttp://www.economist.com/node/17572735$$yExternal link
000007214 980__ $$aARTICLE